Contact

Erin Wolfe
Dole Institute of Politics
785-864-1420

Dole Institute honors former Sen. Inouye

Wed, 12/19/2012

Daniel K. Inouye


LAWRENCE — The Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas will display a special memorial exhibit for former U.S. Sen. Daniel K. Inouye through Jan. 25. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Inouye, 88, passed away Dec. 17 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after suffering respiratory complications. The exhibit follows the development of Inouye's friendship with former U.S. Sen. Bob Dole, from its inception at Percy Jones Army Hospital through their decades-long bipartisan political relationship, as well as recent service recognitions. An online tribute to the senator, featuring photographs and an oral history interview given by Inouye, all from the collections of the Dole Archive, is available here.

"Through their shared experience as World War II veterans overcoming life-changing injuries, Senators Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) inspired one another to lead lives of public service at the national level," said Dole Institute senior archivist Audrey Coleman. "Their remarkable friendship spanned more than 60 years of political and private life. Despite both partisan and philosophical differences, Inouye and Dole found common ground on a whole series of issues."

Following Hawaii's acceptance to statehood in 1959, Inouye served as Hawaii's first congressman. He ran for the Senate in 1962 where he served for nearly nine consecutive terms. He fought for veterans rights and benefits. Recalling Inouye's service to the Senate, Dole remarked that "Senator Inouye was one of the Senate's giants. He believed in civility and compromise when necessary." This reputation earned Inouye seats on the Watergate Committee, the special committee on the Iran-Contra Affair and many other Senate committees.

 



When looking to tackle the issue of obesity in rural America, where should we start? The answer is not what you might think. Empathy, says Christie Befort, an associate professor at KU who has just won a $10 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to investigate solutions to rural obesity. Many physicians are embarrassed talking about weight—especially in a small town where everybody knows each other, Befort says. By providing obesity treatment options in rural primary care, she plans to start a conversation, and maybe a revolution, in rural health care. For more details on Befort's efforts, check out the 2015 Chancellor's Report: http://bit.ly/1D5A5MO and her video: http://bit.ly/1C5xYZa Tags: #KUcommunities #Obesity #Health #Rural #Midwest Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute - PCORI

Groundwater level decline continues across western, central Kansas. http://t.co/MQ7AO3aZK0 #KUcommunities
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times