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Jill Jess Phythyon
KU News Service
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KU to test emergency public address system Feb. 5

Mon, 02/04/2013

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas will broadcast a test of the emergency public address system at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 5.

The public address system is part of the comprehensive emergency notification system at KU. During the test, a three-second alert tone will sound, followed by the test message. Building occupants should continue with normal activities during the tests.

Speakers for the public address system have been installed in and about 79 buildings, reaching 98 percent of KU’s academic areas. The buildings comprise the highest concentration of students, faculty and staff.

The public address system allows emergency dispatchers in the 911 center to provide real-time voice messages to an individual building, a group of buildings or to all equipped buildings.

In the case of inclement weather, the test will be rescheduled to Feb. 7.

Other facets of the university’s multitiered emergency notification strategy include

  • Text message alerts: More than 20,000 students, faculty and staff are signed up to receive emergency text messages. Those who have not yet signed up are encouraged to do so at alert.ku.edu.
  • E-mail alerts: The university’s emergency broadcast e-mail system can reach about 33,000 KU e-mail accounts.
  • Web page alerts: The university will use alert.ku.edu as a centralized location for information updates.
  • The university has established protocols to use local media to help inform the public in the event of an ongoing crisis.

The university also maintains the 864-SNOW hotline that is activated if bad weather forces the delay or cancellation of classes or the closure of campus.



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

#KUfacts : There are 30+ tenant companies in the Bioscience & Technology Business Center at KU. http://t.co/PqeeY5r16W #growKS
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
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Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
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