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Noel Rasor
Public Management Center
913-897-8460

KU announces new Emerging Leaders Academy graduates

Mon, 03/04/2013

TOPEKA – The University of Kansas Public Management Center has announced the latest graduates of the Emerging Leaders Academy. The graduation ceremony was Feb. 1 on the KU Edwards Campus.  The 49 graduates, who began their course in September, included staff from local, county, state and federal agencies from across Kansas as well as from KU. There were two co-horts who participated in classes in Mission or Topeka.

Offered through KU’s Public Management Center, ELA is a succession planning program targeted to promising, nonmanagerial staff to help them prepare for leadership roles in their departments and agencies. Participants meet together 10 times over five months, with classes that combine skill enhancement around topics that are essential to effective leadership — and that can be put to use immediately in any position — with career planning to help participants identify the roles they seek in the future and prepare to successfully compete for those roles.

“As baby boomers reach retirement age and public agencies offer incentives to encourage workers to retire as a cost-cutting measure, there’s a growing need for a skilled, prepared talent pool ready to take on those leadership roles,” said Charles Jones, director of the PMC.

The Emerging Leaders Academy will be offered again starting March 6 in Lenexa and March 8 in Topeka. There are still a couple of spaces remaining in each class. Additionally, plans are under way to bring the Emerging Leaders Academy to Wichita this summer through a partnership with the Hugo Wall School at Wichita State University.

The standard program fee for ELA is $1,150; the KU staff rate is $875. The cost covers all training days and materials. The PMC can work with departments on payment arrangements if necessary.

For more information or to apply, visit the ELA website or contact Noel Rasor at (913) 897-8460 or noel@ku.edu.

This year’s graduates are listed below:

  • Stephanie Amis, Wyandotte County Community Corrections, Kansas City    
  • Jeremy Scott Amos, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, Hillsboro    
  • Christopher Arnold, Wyandotte County Sheriff's Department, Kansas City    
  • Nichole Asquith, City of Olathe, Olathe    
  • Thomas Audley, City of Lenexa, Lenexa    
  • Toby Axelsson, University of Kansas Information Technology, Lawrence    
  • Michelle Barnes, Shawnee County Sheriff's Office, Topeka    
  • Brett Becker, University of Kansas Information Technology, Lawrence    
  • David Becker, Johnson County Water Quality Laboratory, Olathe    
  • Bonnie Bloesser, Unified Government of Wyandotte County, Kansas City, Kan.  
  • Dawn Brintle, Johnson County Treasury & Financial Management, Olathe    
  • Terry Lee Brookhouser Jr., Kansas Public Employees Retirement System, Topeka    
  • Nancy Cooper, City of Independence, Mo., Finance Department, Independence    
  • Katy Crow, City of Lenexa, Lenexa    
  • Terry Dickson, Kansas State Treasurer, Topeka    
  • Kevin G. Glur, Johnson County Government, Olathe    
  • Jade Graham, Johnson County Developmental Supports, Lenexa    
  • Rachel Gyore, University of Kansas Medical Center, Dykes Library, Kansas City    
  • Alec Hawley, Kansas Public Employees Retirement System, Topeka    
  • Joey Heideman, Olathe Fire Department, Olathe    
  • Jeannie Heil, University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning, Lawrence    
  • Bryan P. Hill, Olathe Police Department, Olathe    
  • Teresa Hinson, Johnson County Motor Vehicles, Olathe    
  • David Hogue, Lawrence, Kansas Police Department, Lawrence    
  • John Hooser, Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City    
  • Andrew Jansen, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, Shawnee    
  • Ashley Johnson, Johnson County Motor Vehicles, Mission     
  • Letha Johnson, University of Kansas Libraries, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, University Archives, Lawrence    
  • Joseph Kioko, Johnson County Government, Olathe    
  • Cory Latham, Kansas Bureau of Investigation, Great Bend    
  • Chris Mercer, Kansas State Gaming Agency, Topeka    
  • Teal Navarro, Johnson County Government, Olathe    
  • Steve Priller, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, Junction City    
  • Brian Pruessner, Johnson County Medical Action (Med-Act), Olathe    
  • Jeremy Rogers, City of Independence, Mo., Parks and Recreation Department, Independence    
  • Troy Shaw, Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City Public Works Engineering Department, Kansas City    
  • Ann Smith-Tate, City of Independence, Mo.
  • Sarah Sooter, City of Mission, Parks & Recreation, Mission    
  • Bryan Sorensen, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, St. Paul    
  • Amanda Sprengeler, Kansas Department of Agriculture, Topeka    
  • Eric Spurling, Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Lawrence    
  • Amber Tarrant, Kansas Public Employees Retirement System, Topeka    
  • Amy Tharnish, City of Olathe, Olathe    
  • Anna Van Schoelandt, Willow Domestic Violence Center, Lawrence    
  • Derek VanSchmus, City of Olathe, Olathe    
  • Amy Warren, Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center, Lawrence    
  • Lisa Webster, Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center, Hutchinson    
  • Bryan Woerner, Cottonwood Inc., Lawrence    
  • Troy Young, Johnson County Wastewater, Mission.

 



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