KU Indigenous Studies Program offers new graduate certificate

Tue, 03/12/2013

Contact

Kristi Henderson
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
785-864-3663

LAWRENCE – After students and faculty expressed interest in further opportunities to pursue indigenous studies, graduate students at the University of Kansas can now receive certification for studies in indigenous people and cultures of the United States.

The Indigenous Studies Program, which already offers a master’s degree, will add the multidisciplinary graduate certificate as an option beginning in fall 2013. The program gives students an essential understanding of the relationship between the U.S. and indigenous nations and peoples. Students working toward certification will gain knowledge of related historical, political, religious and social issues.

The additional credential of indigenous studies knowledge will aid students in further research, study and professional practice with indigenous organizations, peoples, government and many other fields.

To receive the certificate, graduate students must complete 12 hours in approved courses. Graduate courses that will meet the requirement must have at least 50 percent of their content focused on indigenous peoples. Courses will span various departments in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and some professional schools, including sociology, linguistics, environmental studies, visual art and law. The program is open to all students admitted to a KU graduate program and to certificate-seeking graduate students.

KU is the only Big 12 university to offer a graduate certificate in indigenous studies. Currently the only other Big 12 school with a graduate degree in the area of indigenous/native studies is the University of Oklahoma, which offers a master’s degree.

For more information, visit the Indigenous Studies Program website.

The Indigenous Studies Program is part of KU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, which encourages learning without boundaries in its more than 50 departments, programs and centers. Through innovative research and teaching, the College emphasizes interdisciplinary education, global awareness and experiential learning. It is the broadest and most diverse academic unit at KU.



5 am may be early, but for the die-hard autumn lovers, it’s time to kick off the season with the campus starlight walking tour. Led by retired professor Theodore Johnson, the tour will begin on 14th and Jayhawk Boulevard tomorrow morning. For more information, click here: http://bit.ly/YZETlE

KU Goldwater Scholar to research Huntingon’s, Alzheimer’s diseases Ryan Limbocker, KU’s 56th Goldwater Scholar, plans to focus his research at KU on such neurodegenerative disorders as Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s diseases (see more at http://bit.ly/1nIP2bL). Limbocker, a senior majoring in chemistry, is from Overland Park, Kansas, and plans to pursue a doctorate in analytical chemistry. The Goldwater Scholarships are the nation’s premier undergraduate awards to honor academically gifted students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.


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