Langston Hughes visiting professor to present lecture on civil rights movement

Mon, 04/08/2013

Contact

Gavin Young
KU Office of Public Affairs
785-864-7100

LAWRENCE — David G. Holmes, the spring 2013 Langston Hughes Visiting Professor, will present “Occupy This: Political Representation, Prophetic Voices, Popular Culture and the Contested Rhetorical Legacies of the Civil Rights Movement” at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, in the Kansas Room of the Kansas Union. The lecture is free and open to the public. A reception will follow.

Holmes is professor of English and director of African-American studies at Pepperdine University.

The Langston Hughes Visiting Professorship was established at the University of Kansas in 1977 in honor of the African-American poet, playwright and fiction writer who lived in Lawrence from 1903 to 1916. The professorship brings a prominent or emerging minority scholar to KU for one semester each year.

Holmes is serving as a visiting professor in the Department of English. He is the author of "Revisiting Racialized Voice: African-American Ethos in Language and Literature." His current interests include African-American expressive culture, political rhetoric, political theology, religious rhetoric and rhetorics of racism. He has been at Pepperdine since 1993.

Holmes is teaching one undergraduate course on fiction, film and music about the civil rights movement and a graduate seminar exploring a few of the contemporary rhetorical, religious, political and pedagogical implications of the civil rights movements. 

More information on the Langston Hughes Visiting Professorship, including a complete list of past recipients, is available online.



Yesterday we introduced you to KU professor Rolfe Mandel and the discoveries he and his students are making. Watch this video to learn more. Tags: #KUdiscoveries #KUresearch #Archeology #Plains

Yesterday we introduced you to KU professor Rolfe Mandel. Watch this video to learn more about his #KUdiscoveries : http://t.co/lTYBdqqmCM
KU ODYSSEY team digs for clues to ancient Pleistocene people Searching for evidence of early people living on the plains in the late Pleistocene age, (see http://bit.ly/1li6uYX) Rolfe Mandel, a KU distinguished professor of anthropology, led an excavation in July 2014 in the “Coffey Site” along the Big Blue River bank in Pottawatomie County, Kansas. Mandel says artifacts from Pleistocene period sediments could provide more clues about the Clovis and pre-Clovis people, who were the founding inhabitants of the Americas.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times