KU ROTC commissions new officers

Tue, 06/04/2013

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John D. Clark
Army ROTC
785-864-1113

LAWRENCE – Thirty-five new graduates of the University of Kansas were honored as newly commissioned officers in the armed forces during ceremonies May 20. An additional two graduates of other universities were honored as well.

Bernadette Gray-Little, chancellor, and Sara Rosen, senior vice provost for academic affairs, welcomed the cadets, midshipmen and their families, friends and guests.  Navy Rear Admiral Phil Davidson delivered the keynote speech and administered the oath of office for the new officers. 

Commanding officers presenting the commissions were Lt. Col. Storm Reynolds, professor of military science; Lt. Col. Montague Samuel, professor of aerospace studies; and Capt. David Schweizer, professor of naval science. 

KU is one of only 50 universities in the nation offering an ROTC program that represents all branches of the military. KU’s ROTC program also trains cadets from Baker University, Haskell Indian Nations University, MidAmerica Nazarene University, University of Saint Mary, Washburn University and Benedictine University. 

The newly commissioned officers are listed below by name, hometown and area of study.

Army:

  • Tyler Beck, Andover, economics
  • Mitchell Chiles, Salina, geography
  • Kaleb Gilmore, Hoyt, finance.
  • Andrew Haanpaa, St. Clair, Mo., biological anthropology
  • Blake Horvath, Fort Leavenworth, history
  • Nathan Kalish, Marthasville, Mo., history
  • Kayla Fletcher, Kansas City, Mo., cellular biology
  • Scott Kristenson, Newton, cellular biology
  • Michael Laverty, Manassas, Va., political science
  • Sarah Meyer, New London, Iowa, industrial design and art history
  • Garret Moe, Newton, psychology
  • York Olszewski, Leavenworth, mathematics
  • Josh Robinson, Lansing, history
  • Matthew Visser, Harker Heights, Texas, political science, French and global and international studies
  • Jacob Walters, Prairie Village, geography

Navy:

  • Ivan Babkov, Wichita, biochemistry
  • Luke Ezell, Leavenworth, electrical engineering
  • Dale Hardee, Topeka, mechanical engineering
  • Christopher McGaffin, Wichita, mathematics
  • Thomas McSweeney, Herman, Neb., electrical engineering
  • Alexander Pendleton, San Antonio, cellular biology
  • Nathan Slaughter, San Diego, psychology

Marine:

  • Kyle Gillogly, Dell Rapids, S.D., business-information systems
  • Ethan Ness, Shorewood, Minn., business management-leadership
  • Joe Santos, Pawtucket, R.I., history and African studies
  • Paul Speckin, Overland Park, business-finance

Air Force:

  • Nicholas Brunkhorst, Mitchell, Neb., Aerospace Engineering
  • Mason Bruza, Paola, physics
  • Britni Charles, Haysville, political science
  • Zachary Early, Las Vegas, Slavic languages and literatures
  • Cole-Christian Holinaty, Fort Leavenworth, communication studies
  • Kevin Jackson, St. Louis, communication studies
  • Brian Tabares, Emporia, psychology
  • Seth Wilson, Berkley, Mich., African-American studies
  • Grant Worden, Rochester, Minn., aerospace engineering.

Commissions were also presented to two students who graduated from other universities:

  • Travis Clarke, Army, Eudora, son of Gus and Cynthia Andrews, criminal justice from MidAmerica Nazarene University
  • Matthew Goyette, Army, Overland Park, Masters of Business Administration from MidAmerica Nazarene University.


Tomorrow, Daisy Hill will be buzzing with students moving into their new homes. Traffic will be congested near residence halls, and these areas should be avoided when possible. Moving to Daisy Hill? (Templin, Lewis, Hashinger, Ellsworth, McCollum) See your move-in instructions here: http://bit.ly/1kbd6Yy Moving to Oliver, Corbin, GSP or the scholarship halls? Here’s what you need to know: http://bit.ly/1lhIt4w

The Spencer Museum of Art has nearly 36,000 artworks and artifacts, making it an incredible #KUexperience . http://t.co/S3Z2HlyZDb #KUfacts
KU Orientation: Making a home on the Hill See why you made the right choice in becoming a Jayhawk as you go through KU’s Orientation process (http://firstyear.ku.edu/orientation). You’ll discover what it means to make KU your home: trying new things, building friendships, getting involved, seeking out career path advice from faculty, studying abroad, or even conducting your own research as a freshman or a graduate student.


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