KU announces June employees of the month

Thu, 08/01/2013

LAWRENCE —The University of Kansas has bestowed Employee of the Month honors for June 2013. They are as follows:

University Support Staff Employee of the Month

Who: Laurie Funk

Start date: 2006

Current title: Payroll and benefits specialist, Human Resources

Laurie FunkWhat that means: Funk keys new hires and reappointment information into the HRPay system, which was upgraded in a major overhaul in 2012. One sometimes complex duty involves verification of the information on a new offer letter with data in the HRPay system. Funk also is called on to correct the data entry of colleagues when necessary.

Notable: For a significant part of two years, Funk covered for a vacant staff position and trained three new hires into the job in addition to completing all her own responsibilities and tasks. Due to turnover, she has at times had the sole responsibility for keying every appointment on campus. This not only requires excellent attention to detail and tracking several payroll panels at once, but the individual also must field the many inquiries that flow in regarding activation of appointments and any issues holding them up. Funk skillfully juggles it all.

 

University Unclassified Staff Employee of the Month

Who: Andrew Hause

Start date: 1996

Current title: Associate technical director for the Lied Center

Andrew HauseWhat that means: Hause leads crews of students and professional stagehands in all aspects of running the technical systems for shows and events at the Lied Center. He also maintains the technical systems and makes sure all backstage areas are clean, safe, and organized. He provides a vital service that makes it possible for the Lied Center both to operate and to offer a rich and diverse performing arts experience. He also works with a variety of artists, faculty and staff.

Notable: A large Broadway-tour show might require Hause to work nonstop from a 7 a.m load-in through the performance and then to completion of load-out in the early morning hours. This is extremely hard work and requires he be on his feet, working and negotiating with the road crew, managing large groups of stagehands (up to 60 or 70 for a large show), integrating technical systems, troubleshooting and solving myriad problems. One recent example of his adaptability was mounting the "Guru of Chai," designed for a small theater, in the Lied Center Pavilion. This required extensive creativity and technical genius to make work, but Hause and his team made it happen, and the show went off without a hitch.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Turning rural America healthy: Christie Befort uses $10 million award. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/Bsuek4k9QC
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
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Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
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