Contact

Kyle Garcia
KU Continuing Education
785-864-7857

Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center announces August graduates

Fri, 08/23/2013

YODER — Shawnee County Sheriff Herman T. Jones congratulated 47 new law enforcement officers during their graduation from the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center on Aug. 2.

The new officers were members of the 224th basic training class at the center. Located one mile west and one mile south of Yoder, near Hutchinson, the center is a division of University of Kansas Continuing Education.

The graduates, who began their training April 22, represented 30 municipal, county and state law enforcement agencies across Kansas.

Graduates receive certificates of course completion from KLETC and Kansas law enforcement certification from the Kansas Commission on Peace Officers’ Standards and Training, the state’s law enforcement licensing authority. The training course fulfills the state requirement for law enforcement training. Classroom lectures and hands-on applications help train officers to solve the increasingly complex problems they face in the line of duty.

Established by the Kansas Legislature in 1968, the center trains the majority of municipal, county and state law enforcement officers in Kansas and oversees the training of the remaining officers at seven authorized and certified academy programs operated by local law enforcement agencies and the Kansas Highway Patrol.

About 300 officers enroll annually in the 14-week basic training program. The center offered continuing education and specialized training to as many as 5,600 Kansas officers each year. Funding for the training center is generated from court docket fees from municipal and state courts. No funds from the state’s general revenue are used to operate the center.

Graduates who granted permission to release their names are listed below by county, then agency:

Atchison County

Atchison County Sheriff’s Department; David Worley; deputy; Atchison

Butler County

El Dorado Police Department; Brent Moore; patrol officer; El Dorado

Cowley County

Arkansas City Police Department; Chase Hobart; patrol officer; Arkansas City

Cowley County Sheriff’s Department; Scott Porter; deputy; Winfield

Douglas County

Eudora Police Department; Dylan Eckard; patrol officer; Eudora

Eudora Police Department; Brandon Stofko; patrol officer; Eudora

Greenwood County

Greenwood County Sheriff’s Department; Wesley Stewart; deputy; Eureka

Jackson County

Holton Police Department; Brian Barber; patrol officer; Holton

Labette County

Parsons Police Department; Seth Weidert; patrol officer; Parsons

Leavenworth County

Leavenworth County Sheriff’s Office; Sarah Flaherty; corporal; Leavenworth

Leavenworth Police Department; Bradley Brandon; patrol officer; Leavenworth

Leavenworth Police Department; Sean Flynn; patrol officer; Leavenworth

Leavenworth Police Department; Ryan Hoppe; patrol officer; Leavenworth

McPherson County

McPherson Police Department; Ryan Olbricht; patrol officer; McPherson

Montgomery County

Independence Police Department; Dustin Taylor; patrol officer; Independence

Independence Police Department; Timothy Townley; patrol officer; Independence

Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office; Christopher Bishop; deputy; Independence

Osage County

Overbrook Police Department; Terry Hollingsworth; patrol officer; Overbrook

Phillips County

Phillips County Sheriff’s Department; Brian Rudd; deputy; Phillipsburg

Pottawatomie County

St. George Police Department; Michael Porter; patrol officer; St. George

Wamego Police Department; Derek Gray; patrol officer; Wamego

Pratt County

Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks & Tourism; Bradley Simpson; chief; Pratt

Reno County

Hutchinson Police Department; Anthony Garcia; patrol officer; Hutchinson

Hutchinson Police Department; Joshua Jones; patrol officer; Hutchinson

Hutchinson Police Department; David Lowy; patrol officer; Hutchinson

Hutchinson Police Department; Michael Pohlman; patrol officer; Hutchinson

Reno County Sheriff’s Office; Kaleb McDaniel; deputy; Hutchinson

Reno County Sheriff’s Office; Andrew Yoder; deputy; Hutchinson

Riley County

Riley County Police Department; Grant Bishop; patrol officer; Manhattan

Riley County Police Department; Bradley Swoyer; patrol officer; Manhattan

Riley County Police Department; Tyrone Townsend; patrol officer; Manhattan

Scott County

Scott City Police Department; Jason Wolfe; patrol officer; Scott City

Sedgwick County

Derby Police Department; Curtis Patten; patrol officer; Derby

Derby Police Department; Joshua Williams; patrol officer; Derby

Wichita State University Police Department; Andrew Abbey; patrol officer; Wichita

Wichita State University Police Department; Michael Colvin; patrol officer; Wichita

Wichita State University Police Department; Kegan Harmes; patrol officer; Wichita

Wichita State University Police Department; Eric Lin; patrol officer; Wichita

Wichita State University Police Department; Mario Martinez; patrol officer; Wichita

Seward County

Liberal Police Department; Ben Garner; patrol officer; Liberal

Liberal Police Department; Robert Breeden; patrol officer; Liberal

Washington County

Washington County Sheriff’s Department; Christopher Speakman; deputy; Washington

Wyandotte County

Wyandotte County Sheriff’s Department; Timothy Mock; deputy; Kansas City

Kansas City Kan. Community College Campus Police; Justin Longoria; patrol officer; Kansas City.



Tears. Smiles. And hugs. That’s what Match Day brought as KU Medical Center’s first Salina class learned where they would go for their residencies — the next step in their medical training. See the Salina Journal’s report and photos: http://bit.ly/1HtAWbW Tags: #KUworks #KUmatch #Match2015 University of Kansas Medical Center Salina Journal KU School of Medicine-Wichita

Best thing about Kansas? The sunsets. Always. #exploreKU shot by umbrellaphoto on insta. http://t.co/KB7MhzkzDm
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times