KU announces July employees of the month

Wed, 08/28/2013

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas has bestowed Employee of the Month honors for July 2013. Winners are as follows:

University Support Staff Employee of the Month

Who: Sandra Lollis

Start date: April 2011

Current title: Administrative associate senior, Facilities Services Zone 6

What that means: Lollis is a customer liaison, manages purchasing through the new electronic system, does data entry, and she serves as her work group’s time keeper, accountant and much more.

Notable: Lollis always willingly goes beyond the call of duty to get her work done and is innovative and enterprising. She handled the challenges and opportunities that came with the FO/Housing Maintenance merger with grace and a positive attitude. Changes at KU have required Lollis to learn all new operational procedures and a new computerized maintenance management system for work request documentation and completion.

University Unclassified Staff Employee of the Month

Who: Ken Nelson

Start date: May 1995

Current title: Manager, Kansas Data Access and Support Center

What that means: Nelson is responsible for the operation and management of DASC, which develops and makes available a core of databases from state and local government. The staff of DASC has also led the development of the state’s Geographic Information System (GIS) initiatives and policies, and Nelson heads the group responsible for GIS services and also computer services for the KGS. Nelson and his staff interact at all levels with other state agencies (including the departments of commerce and revenue, the Kansas Corporation Commission, and the Kansas Water Office), local government and private industry.

Notable: Under Nelson’s leadership, DASC has become recognized as a national leader in digital database distribution. Nelson is known for hiring and leading an energetic and organized staff. He also worked with the state GIS officer, legislative research staff and various legislators on passage of House Bill 2175 to create and coordinate mapping capability in the state of Kansas



Happy Kansas Day, Kansans! We caught sunflowers standing tall at the Grinter Family Farms just outside Lawrence last fall. You may wonder how the sunflower came to be the State flower in 1903 and we found an excerpt from Kansas legislation: Whereas, Kansas has a native wild flower common throughout her borders, hardy and conspicuous, of definite, unvarying and striking shape, easily sketched, moulded, and carved, having armorial capacities, ideally adapted for artistic reproduction, with its strong, distinct disk and its golden circle of clear glowing rays -- a flower that a child can draw on a slate, a woman can work in silk, or a man can carve on stone or fashion in clay; and Whereas, This flower has to all Kansans a historic symbolism which speaks of frontier days, winding trails, pathless prairies, and is full of the life and glory of the past, the pride of the present, and richly emblematic of the majesty of a golden future, and is a flower which has given Kansas the world-wide name, "the sunflower state"... Be it enacted ... that the helianthus or wild native sunflower is ... designated ... the state flower and floral emblem of the state of Kansas.

Have family visiting Lawrence? #exploreKU and take them to the @KUnhm like @ChrisCanDesign did. http://t.co/PTDSdpSakh
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times