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Brendan Lynch
KU News Service
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Media advisory: Distracted-driving researcher can discuss recent N.J. court decision on legal liability for texting someone who is driving

Fri, 08/30/2013

LAWRENCE — Paul Atchley, professor of psychology at the University of Kansas, is among the nation’s foremost experts on distracted driving and mobile phones. He is available to serve as an expert for journalists reporting on the recent court decision in New Jersey that appears to place legal liability on a person who knowingly texts a driver who is then involved in a crash.

Atchley can discuss: The psychology and dangers associated with drivers who are distracted by mobile phones and the current attitudes toward legal action against distracted drivers.  

To schedule an interview: contact Paul Atchley at patchley@ku.edu (preferred) or 785-864-9803.

Biography: Paul Atchley is a professor of psychology at KU, where he started in 1998. Atchley received his doctoral degree from the University of California, Riverside in 1996 and completed postdoctoral training at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1998. He has been the recipient of both the H. Bernerd Fink Award for Excellence in Teaching (2001) and a Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence (2004). His research is focused on issues of vision and attention related to driving. 



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