Public assistive technology expo set for Sept. 12-13

Wed, 09/11/2013

Contact

Karen Henry
Life Span Institute
785-864-0756

LAWRENCE — A KU Life Span Institute research group, Assistive Technology for Kansans (ATK), will host a free public assistive technology expo from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday and 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday at the Kansas Expocentre, Topeka.

The AT EXPO will have more than 80 vendors from around the country to demonstrate cutting-edge technology to help people with disabilities communicate, read, organize, move, drive, manage medication, bathe, dress, drive, engage in leisure activities and more. Representatives from advocacy and service organizations will also be there.

While the AT EXPO is held in conjunction with a professional conference put on by ATK and the Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association, there are several free sessions for the public on assistive technology issues, according to ATK Director Sara Sack, senior scientist.  

A highlight is a session on technology and programs for farmer/ranchers and with disabilities, including returning veterans interested in becoming first-time farmers, through the Veteran Farmers Project that KU participates in through the ATK’s role in the Kansas AgriAbility project.

Other sessions address “extreme mobility” — mobility options for recreational and work environments; iOS accessibility — how inexpensive apps can turn Apple mobile devices into powerhouses of assistive technology; making a small business plan and transitioning to college and a new program that provides Kansans who are deaf or blind with telecommunications equipment.

More information is available here and here.



This week, we featured Sukhindervir Sandhu and how he is using an undergrad research award to make discoveries. What exactly is he researching? Watch this video to learn how Sandhu is using virus-induced gene silencing to make plants act differently. Tags: #KUdiscoveries #KUresearch #Plants #Genes #Biology

KU student tricks monkey flower into growing protective ‘hair’ Thanks to a KU Undergraduate Research Award (see more at http://ugresearch.ku.edu/student/fund/ugra), Sukhindervir Sandhu, a KU junior in biochemistry, figured out which genetic button to push to get a monkey flower, or Mimulus guttatus, to grow protective trichomes, or plant hair. Sandhu was able to track it down to a gene called SKP-1. By silencing SKP-1, he discovered that gene regulates plant hair growth in monkey flowers.


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