Contact

Kevin Boatright
Office of Research
785-864-7240

Workshop to focus on forming a KU water research community

Wed, 09/11/2013

LAWRENCE — Water is on everyone’s mind this summer, with mounting evidence of dwindling aquifers, extended drought and receding ice sheets. Water is also on the minds of more than 100 University of Kansas faculty and staff members, who will gather this week to define and discuss opportunities for new collaborative research on a host of water-related topics.

The Water Research Workshop is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13, at The Commons, located in Spooner Hall. KU Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Jeff Vitter will address the group, as will Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies Steve Warren. Karen Flournoy, director of the Water, Wetlands and Pesticides Division for Region 7 of the Environmental Protection Agency, is a guest speaker. Susan Stover, manager of High Plains Issues at the Kansas Water Office, will serve as moderator.

“KU has many resources for water research,” said Rex Buchanan, interim director of the Kansas Geological Survey and a member of the planning committee. “We are home to a number of centers, departments and museums that do an amazing amount of research involving biodiversity and the quality, availability and use of water. Some of the best water-related researchers in the world are faculty and staff at KU.”

Another workshop organizer, Ed Martinko, director of the Kansas Biological Survey, said, “The grand challenge with water research goes well beyond science and engineering. To understand it we need to engage the humanities, the arts, the social sciences and education. KU has research strengths in all these areas and the workshop is an opportunity to bring them together to think about water in new and challenging ways.”

KU faculty and staff from more than 30 different departments and research centers will participate in small-group discussions designed to identify high-priority water-related topics. A second round of discussions will focus on these topics and identify cores of interested KU researchers willing to work together. Participants will also learn about university resources available to sustain this effort.  

“The goal of the workshop is to develop a grassroots community of water researchers at KU,” said Tricia Bergman, managing director for collaborative energy initiatives in the Office of Research and Graduate Studies. “We anticipate this being the start of a long-term effort that engages a network of KU researchers with one another and the populations affected by these issues.”

The workshop reflects several of the themes expressed in Bold Aspirations, KU’s strategic plan. These include “Sustaining the Planet, Powering the World” and “Building Communities, Expanding Opportunities.” The plan also encourages “scholarly activities that have direct public impact” and that “engage local, state, national, and global communities as partners.”



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

#KUfacts : There are 30+ tenant companies in the Bioscience & Technology Business Center at KU. http://t.co/PqeeY5r16W #growKS
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times