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Rebecca Murray
University Press of Kansas
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New director announced for University Press of Kansas

Mon, 10/07/2013

LAWRENCE — Charles Myers has been named director for the University Press of Kansas, succeeding Fred Woodward, director of UPK from November 1981 to September 2013.

Charles MyersMyers will be UPK’s fifth director. He served previously as executive editor and group publisher at Princeton University Press. He has a doctorate in political science and juris doctor from the University of Michigan.

“Chuck has built excellent lists in political science, law and American history at the university presses of both Michigan and Princeton,” Woodward said. “I have long thought of him as the best-qualified publisher to lead the University Press of Kansas into the future.”

“I am taking over responsibility for a thriving press with a great staff,” Myers said. “We are going to begin to offer digital editions of our print books, revamp our web site and grow our lists with an emphasis on political science, law, American history, military history, environmental studies, western history, Kansas regional titles and American popular culture.”

Myers has recently signed Robert K. Belton’s book “The Crusade for Equality in the Workplace: The Griggs v. Duke Power Story” and taken over responsibility for two of UPK’s distinguished series, “Landmark Law Cases and American Society” and “Constitutional Thinking.”

Woodward will continue at UPK as senior editor. Michael Briggs remains UPK’s editor-in-chief.

Founded in 1946, University Press of Kansas has more than 900 books in print and adds 55-60 new titles a year. UPK represents six state universities: Emporia, Fort Hays, Kansas, Pittsburg and Wichita state universities and KU. Visit UPK online.



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times