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Rebecca Murray
University Press of Kansas
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New director announced for University Press of Kansas

Mon, 10/07/2013

LAWRENCE — Charles Myers has been named director for the University Press of Kansas, succeeding Fred Woodward, director of UPK from November 1981 to September 2013.

Charles MyersMyers will be UPK’s fifth director. He served previously as executive editor and group publisher at Princeton University Press. He has a doctorate in political science and juris doctor from the University of Michigan.

“Chuck has built excellent lists in political science, law and American history at the university presses of both Michigan and Princeton,” Woodward said. “I have long thought of him as the best-qualified publisher to lead the University Press of Kansas into the future.”

“I am taking over responsibility for a thriving press with a great staff,” Myers said. “We are going to begin to offer digital editions of our print books, revamp our web site and grow our lists with an emphasis on political science, law, American history, military history, environmental studies, western history, Kansas regional titles and American popular culture.”

Myers has recently signed Robert K. Belton’s book “The Crusade for Equality in the Workplace: The Griggs v. Duke Power Story” and taken over responsibility for two of UPK’s distinguished series, “Landmark Law Cases and American Society” and “Constitutional Thinking.”

Woodward will continue at UPK as senior editor. Michael Briggs remains UPK’s editor-in-chief.

Founded in 1946, University Press of Kansas has more than 900 books in print and adds 55-60 new titles a year. UPK represents six state universities: Emporia, Fort Hays, Kansas, Pittsburg and Wichita state universities and KU. Visit UPK online.



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Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
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