KU to host events as part of international Open Access Week

Tue, 10/15/2013

Contact

Katie Coffman
KU Libraries
785-864-4811

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas will join more than 900 institutions from over 90 countries around the world in celebrating shared information and scholarly research as part of the annual Open Access Week from Oct. 21 to Oct. 25. KU Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright will host a series of panels and presentations exploring the practical uses and benefits of open access through the firsthand experience of guest speakers, faculty and staff members.

This year’s Open Access Week also will include a presentation by former KU Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor David Shulenburger on Thursday, Oct. 24. Shulenburger, who retired in 2010 as the vice president of academic affairs for the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, will discuss the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), a federal open access bill pending in Congress, as well as other developments in open access policy and their implications at KU and around the world.

Taking Control of Your Research Visibility: A hands-on guide to improving research “impact” for scholars (Workshop offered by Marc Greenberg and Ada Emmett)

Monday, Oct. 21, 10 a.m., Clark Instruction Center, level 3

Scholarly value or “research impact" is now being measured based on machine-collected data, a system designed primarily for the natural sciences, not social sciences or humanities. While your data is already out there, it may not reflect well on your work, making it critical to educate yourself on the ever-evolving virtual world of innovative research metrics, and take control of what you can. Emmett and Greenberg will offer a hands-on workshop to help you understand research metrics and develop strategies to give your work greater visibility.

This session has reached capacity. The workshop will be held again Nov. 7; contact Ada Emmett at aemmett@ku.edu to attend.

 

Open Access Week 2013 Kickoff Event at the World Bank: Redefining Impact (webinar)

Monday, Oct. 21, 2 p.m., Watson Library, Room 455

The kickoff event follows the World Bank’s open access efforts and is presented by Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the World Bank. The webinar will feature a panel discussion hosted by Heather Joseph, executive director of SPARC. Among the topics to be discussed are Article Level Metrics and changing the way scholarly communication is measured. Following the panel discussion, winning nominations of the new Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP) will be announced. The ASAP Program, sponsored by 27 global organizations, including Google, PLOS and the Wellcome Trust, recognizes those who have built upon open access scientific research for new innovations shaping our society.

 

Heather Piwowar: ImpactStory (presenting via Skype)

Tuesday, Oct. 22, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Watson Library, Room 455

ImpactStory is an open-source, web-based tool that helps researchers explore and share the diverse effects of all their research products. By helping researchers tell data-driven stories about their effects, ImpactStory helps to build a new scholarly reward system that values and encourages web-native scholarship. Heather Piwowar, co-founder of ImpactStory, will be joining the week’s activities with a presentation via Skype.

 

Graduate Student pizza lunch and presentation by Nick Shockey, SPARC

Wednesday, Oct. 23, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Watson Library, 3rd floor West

Graduate students are invited to attend a pizza lunch and join an informal discussion with Nick Shockey, director of student advocacy at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition about how open access affects them as scholars. RSVPs are encouraged: libcds@ku.edu

 

David Shulenburger: Federal Funding Agencies Push Toward Open Access: FASTR, the White House Directive, and KU

Thursday, Oct. 24, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., Watson Library, 3rd floor West

This past February, the bipartisan FASTR bill was introduced in Congress with the purpose of making federally funded scientific research available to the public. Soon after, the White House issued a similar directive to federal agencies encouraging them to prepare for broader access and publication of their research. David Shulenburger, former KU Provost and ongoing champion for open access, will examine these developments and the impact it will have on publicly funded research universities.

 

Impacts of Openness lightning talks (moderated by David Shulenburger)

Friday, Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Watson Library, Room 455

This event brings together several speakers from a variety of fields who will each give a 10-minute presentation about the impact of openness in their work, with questions from the audience to follow. Among the scheduled presenters are William Keel, KU professor of Germanic languages and literatures; A. Townsend Peterson, KU professor of ecology and evolutionary biology; KU librarians Deborah Dandridge and Sarah Goodwin Thiel; Steven Lee, KU professor and chair, Department of Psychology and Research in Education; Andi Witczak and Amanda Schwegler, KU Center for Service Learning; Matt DeSarle, social media producer for KMBC in Kansas City; and Orley “Chip” Taylor, KU professor of ecology and evolutionary biology.

Taking Control of Your Research Visibility: A hands-on guide to improving research “impact” for scholars (Workshop offered by Marc Greenberg and Ada Emmett)
Monday, Oct. 21, 10 a.m., Clark Instruction Center, level 3
Scholarly value or “research impact" is now being measured based on machine-collected data, a system designed primarily for the natural sciences, not social sciences or humanities. While your data is already out there, it may not reflect well on your work, making it critical to educate yourself on the ever-evolving virtual world of innovative research metrics, and take control of what you can. Emmett and Greenberg will offer a hands-on workshop to help you understand research metrics and develop strategies to give your work greater visibility.
This session has reached capacity. The workshop will be held again Nov. 7; contact Ada Emmett at aemmett@ku.edu to attend.
 
Open Access Week 2013 Kickoff Event at the World Bank: Redefining Impact (webinar)
Monday, Oct. 21, 2 p.m., Watson Library, Room 455
The kickoff event follows the World Bank’s open access efforts and is presented by Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the World Bank. The webinar will feature a panel discussion hosted by Heather Joseph, executive director of SPARC. Among the topics to be discussed are Article Level Metrics and changing the way scholarly communication is measured. Following the panel discussion, winning nominations of the new Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP) will be announced. The ASAP Program, sponsored by 27 global organizations, including Google, PLOS and the Wellcome Trust, recognizes those who have built upon open access scientific research for new innovations shaping our society.
 
Heather Piwowar: ImpactStory (presenting via Skype)
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 1 p.m.-2:30 p.m., Watson Library, Room 455
ImpactStory is an open-source, web-based tool that helps researchers explore and share the diverse effects of all their research products. By helping researchers tell data-driven stories about their effects, ImpactStory helps to build a new scholarly reward system that values and encourages web-native scholarship. Heather Piwowar, co-founder of ImpactStory, will be joining the week’s activities with a presentation via Skype.
 
Graduate Student pizza lunch and presentation by Nick Shockey, SPARC
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Watson Library, 3rd floor West
Graduate students are invited to attend a pizza lunch and join an informal discussion with Nick Shockey, director of student advocacy at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition about how open access affects them as scholars. RSVPs are encouraged: libcds@ku.edu
 
David Shulenburger: Federal Funding Agencies Push Toward Open Access: FASTR, the White House Directive, and KU
Thursday, Oct. 24, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., Watson Library, 3rd floor West
This past February, the bipartisan FASTR bill was introduced in Congress with the purpose of making federally funded scientific research available to the public. Soon after, the White House issued a similar directive to federal agencies encouraging them to prepare for broader access and publication of their research. David Shulenburger, former KU Provost and ongoing champion for open access, will examine these developments and the impact it will have on publicly funded research universities.
 
Impacts of Openness lightning talks (moderated by David Shulenburger)
Friday, Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, Watson Library, Room 455
This event brings together several speakers from a variety of fields who will each give a 10-minute presentation about the impact of openness in their work, with questions from the audience to follow. Among the scheduled presenters are William Keel, KU professor of Germanic languages and literatures; A. Townsend Peterson, KU professor of ecology and evolutionary biology; KU librarians Deborah Dandridge and Sarah Goodwin Thiel; Steven Lee, KU professor and chair, Department of Psychology and Research in Education; Andi Witczak and Amanda Schwegler, KU Center for Service Learning; Matt DeSarle, social media producer for KMBC in Kansas City; and Orley “Chip” Taylor, KU professor of ecology and evolutionary biology.

In 2009, KU’s Faculty Senate made KU the first public university in the United States to adopt an open access policy regarding faculty research published in peer-review journals. Lorraine Haricombe, dean of KU Libraries, hopes that events like Open Access Week will continue to raise awareness and drive scientific research toward broader availability.

“KU has made tremendous progress in creating a standard of open access at our university, and it is a vital asset that new information be widely available for faculty and researchers alike,” Haricombe said. “Universities are responsible for contributing their work to both scholars and society as a whole, and open access policies represent a step forward for research everywhere.”

For more information about open access at KU, visit openaccess.ku.edu.



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