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Joseph Harrington
Department of English
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Colorado poets will give reading Nov. 7

Thu, 10/24/2013

LAWRENCE — Matthew Cooperman, poetry editor for the Colorado Review, and Aby Kaupang, author of "Little 'g' God Grows Tired of Me" (2013), will give a reading Nov. 7 at the University of Kansas.

Cooperman and Kaupang will present along with doctoral student Callista Buchen at 7 p.m. in the Malott Room at the Kansas Union. The event is sponsored by the English MFA program.

Cooperman is am associate professor of English at Colorado State University and a founding editor of the journal Quarter After Eight. His most recent book, a collaboration with artist Marius Lehene, is titled "Imago for the Fallen World" (2013). His other books include "Still: of the Earth as the Ark Which Does Not Move" (2011) and "A Sacrificial Zinc" (2001), winner of the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize.

Kaupang is the author of "Little 'g' God Grows Tired of Me" (2013), "Absence is Such a Transparent House" (2011), and "Scenic Fences | Houses Innumerable" (2008). Her work has appeared in the journals FENCE, Verse, Denver Quarterly, The Laurel Review, Parthenon West and others. She has both an MFA in Creative Writing and a Masters of Occupational Therapy from Colorado State University.  

Cooperman and Kaupang live in Fort Collins, Colo., with their two children. The pair are currently at work on a book-length documentary poem that details their interactions with the medical establishment on behalf of their autistic daughter.

Buchen will open the reading. Winner of DIAGRAM's 2012 essay contest and the Langston Hughes Award in fiction, she is a graduate student in poetry. Her work has appeared in Bellevue Review, Pear Noir!, PANK, Arsenic Lobster, Blue Mesa Review, A cappella Zoo and other journals. She has been nominated for Best New Poets and a Pushcart Prize.

The reading is free and open to the public.

The Department of English is in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The College encourages learning without boundaries in its more than 50 departments, programs and centers. Curriculum in the College emphasizes interdisciplinary education, global awareness and experiential learning. The College is KU's broadest, most diverse academic unit.



Happy Kansas Day, Kansans! We caught sunflowers standing tall at the Grinter Family Farms just outside Lawrence last fall. You may wonder how the sunflower came to be the State flower in 1903 and we found an excerpt from Kansas legislation: Whereas, Kansas has a native wild flower common throughout her borders, hardy and conspicuous, of definite, unvarying and striking shape, easily sketched, moulded, and carved, having armorial capacities, ideally adapted for artistic reproduction, with its strong, distinct disk and its golden circle of clear glowing rays -- a flower that a child can draw on a slate, a woman can work in silk, or a man can carve on stone or fashion in clay; and Whereas, This flower has to all Kansans a historic symbolism which speaks of frontier days, winding trails, pathless prairies, and is full of the life and glory of the past, the pride of the present, and richly emblematic of the majesty of a golden future, and is a flower which has given Kansas the world-wide name, "the sunflower state"... Be it enacted ... that the helianthus or wild native sunflower is ... designated ... the state flower and floral emblem of the state of Kansas.

RT @caboni : Great to host the @Surgeon _General for another stop on his national listening tour at @KUMedCenter http://t.co/jYi0SbaVZt
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times