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Charles Linn
School of Architecture, Design & Planning
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The art of the jack-o-lantern

Tue, 10/29/2013

LAWRENCE – It isn’t so unusual to see “knife-wielding zombies” in Marvin Hall. Usually they’re just sleep-deprived architecture and design students intent on finishing their projects before deadline.

However, Oct. 30, something more fiendish may be afoot, when the American Institute of Architecture Students hosts its annual pumpkin-carving contest.

Halloween pumpkin carving has been a traditional activity for KU architecture and design students dating back decades. That’s because the day before All Hallows Eve, it is only natural for ghouls to grasp their blades and go looking for trouble.

Sounds dreadful, but event organizer and AIAS president Austin Griffis opines that KU’s architecture and design students are inclined to slash gently, in a kind and creative way that he promises will not involve chainsaws of any kind, or the Department of Architecture’s precision laser cutter.

“The pumpkins will delight and dazzle spectators, and the work will be judged on the same criteria that is used for diamonds: cut, color and clarity,” said Griffis.

All are welcome to attend the event at 6 p.m. Oct. 30 in 216 Marvin Hall. AIAS members will have the first crack at the orange orbs, donated by Hy-Vee, but others are welcome to bring their own. The event will also serve as a kickoff for the AIAS’s annual canned food drive.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Turning rural America healthy: Christie Befort uses $10 million award. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/Bsuek4k9QC
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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