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Architecture student wins Award of Excellence

Fri, 12/13/2013

LAWRENCE — University of Kansas Department of Architecture student Aydin Tabrizi won an Award of Excellence for his research at the Construction Information Technology Alliance conference, which took place last month in Dublin, Ireland.

The conference’s theme was leveraging a technology called building information modeling (BIM) to improve the practices of architecture, engineering and construction.

Doctoral student Tabrizi’s case study studied optimizing the operational of performance of a highly efficent LEED-rated building using BIM. His objective was to evaluate its capacity to achieve a net-zero energy performance. This means that the building would contribute as much energy to the grid as it uses annually.

Net-zero buildings have become the holy grail of building designers everywhere, but actually establishing how it can be done is difficult. To achieve this, Tabrizi created a digital model of the building and simulated how it energy-efficient it could be made under optimal circumstances using two different methodologies.

The results were used to compare to the actual building’s performance and evaluate alternative renewable energy scenarios. The results were used to make recommendations for the optimization of the building’s performance and consideration of energy-efficient strategies for building performance enhancement. The research also found that assumptions regarding the efficiency of photovoltaic panels sometimes disregard the fact that they degrade over time.

A paper he wrote, “Evaluation of Renewable Energy Strategies Using Building Information Modeling and Energy Simulation” will be published in the International Journal of 3D Modeling in January. Architecture Department chair Paola Sanguinetti was its coauthor.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Today in #KUhistory : "The Dove" student newspaper makes its debut, 1925. http://t.co/5FpIT2MIKG http://t.co/ciUAvZx65M
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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