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Christine Metz Howard
KU News Service
785-864-8852

Media Advisory: Faculty can speak about Shirley Temple; Icon campaigned for Bob Dole in Kansas

Tue, 02/11/2014

LAWRENCE — Shirley Temple Black, the iconic child film star known for singing and dancing to cheer up Americans during the Great Depression, died Monday, Feb. 10, at her home in California. University of Kansas experts are available to speak about Temple Black’s legacy on the big screen.

John Tibbetts, associate professor of theatre and film, can speak to Temple Black's legacy as a shining star during Depression-era America. A triple threat who could sing, act and dance, Temple had entire productions built around her by the mid-1930s. She worked with era’s leading actors and directors. Tibbetts teaches film history, which looks at classic Hollywood movies from the 1930s and 1940s

“Her films hold up very well,” Tibbetts said.

To schedule an interview contact Christine Metz Howard at 785-864-8852 or cmetzhoward@ku.edu

Temple Black, who as an adult was an American diplomat, also has a connection to former Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas. She campaigned in Kansas for Dole and other Republicans in 1968 — a race he later won to secure his first term in the U.S. Senate. Photos of Temple Black and Dole during the 1968 campaign are housed at KU’s Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics, and the images are available via the search engine in the Institute’s Dole Archives.

For more information about the Dole Institute and Dole Archives, contact Heather Anderson at 785-864-1422 or handers@ku.edu.



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

Let's take a trip down to Coronado & #exploreKU at the pool with @KUSwimDive ! (and insta Go_Pro_Guys) http://t.co/SAiwyxiO8F
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


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