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Lecturer to present '50 Jobs in 50 States'

Thu, 02/13/2014

LAWRENCE — Delta Epsilon Iota will host the free event “50 Jobs in 50 States, Exploring America’s Cultures, Careers, and Environments,” which will take place from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, in the Kansas Union, Big 12 Room. University of Kansas students, faculty and staff are welcome to attend.

Daniel Seddiqui traveled all 50 states and worked 50 different jobs in 50 weeks. His mission was to explore the diverse careers, environments and cultures offered in America. He will speak to the KU community about his experience and share information about finding a career and understanding culture and lifestyle.

"What college student doesn't want to know that even if their plans don't work out they can find something that works for them? Daniel's experiences show us all there are alternatives to a more traditional career path,” said Josh Russell, DEI president.

For more information, visit Living the Map, 50 Jobs in 50 States.

The event is sponsored by Coca-Cola, University Career Center, Business Career Services Center, Engineering Career Center and Student Alumni Association.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
RT @srudavsky : More milk news: Drinking it may be good for your brain, @KUnews study finds. http://t.co/KzhkjFtFrs
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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