Timmermann elected AAAS council delegate

Thu, 02/27/2014

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Jackie Hosey
School of Pharmacy
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LAWRENCE — Barbara Timmermann, distinguished professor at the University of Kansas School of Pharmacy Department of Medicinal Chemistry, has been elected to serve as a council delegate for the American Association of the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society. Timmermann will serve a three-year term.

The international organization is dedicated to advancing science for the benefit of all people. The AAAS seeks to advance science, engineering and innovation throughout the world, and it publishes the journal Science. Among their many responsibilities, council members meet annually to review all programs of the association, including meetings and publications, and propose action of the board of directors.

Timmermann said the invitation to serve the AAAS was particularly meaningful because council delegates are chosen by their fellow scientists.

“It is a great honor to be selected by my peers to represent the field of pharmaceutical sciences and most especially KU in this prestigious and global science organization,” Timmerman said.

School of Pharmacy Dean Ken Audus said that honor is shared by everyone at the School of Pharmacy.

“Throughout her career, Barbara Timmermann has drawn the attention of admiration of her colleagues and has frequently been called on to serve the profession,” Audus said. “We are fortunate to have her at the KU School of Pharmacy and grateful to her for giving so much of herself for the betterment of science.”

Timmermann joined the School of Pharmacy faculty as chair of the Department of Medicinal Chemistry in August 2005. She is director of the National Institutes of Health-funded Center for Cancer Experimental Therapeutics, a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) and Fellow of the AAAS. She served as president of the American Society of Pharmacognosy in 2012. She came to KU after an academic career of close to 25 years at the University of Arizona, where she attained the title of regents professor.



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