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Adrienne Landry
Center for Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies
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Twitter project to commemorate WWI centennial

Tue, 04/08/2014

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies (CREES) has announced a new educational outreach initiative utilizing KU students, resources and social media to explore history related to World War I. The #KU_WWI Twitter Project will be a re-enactment of the June 28, 1914, assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo, the historical incident often cited as the initial geopolitical event that resulted in World War I. 

During spring 2014, #KU_WWI Call for Tweeters will take place where students, faculty and staff can learn more about the war and have an opportunity to become re-enactors. Using a #KU_WWI Guide, participants will develop characters, Twitter handles, hashtags and 140-character tweets re-enacting the assassination. Tweets created at these events will form a re-enactment Master Script, which will live-tweet June 28, exactly 100 years after the event. The public will be able to follow along on Twitter through the hashtag #KU_WWI or through Twitter feeds on the crees.ku.edu and european.ku.edu websites.

The #KU_WWI Twitter re-enactment will include a creative storytelling component utilizing the strengths of the community. The re-enactment will incorporate historical, geographical, literary and art references both past and present, making the project a humanities-driven exploration of the events leading up to World War I. Additionally, select tweets developed at the Call for Tweeters will be translated by students enrolled in language classes.

By inviting students to participate, the #KU_WWI Twitter Project will create an experiential learning opportunity to use social media as a tool for engaging different academic skills as well as integrate students and academic units for the study of a single, historical event.

Interested in participating? The first #KU_WWI Call for Tweeters will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 9, in the Malott Room of the Kansas Union. The second will take place at 7 p.m. April 30 in the Alderson Auditorium of the Kansas Union. Students, faculty, staff and members of the local community are welcome to participate in one or both of these events. Participants are encouraged to bring laptops. Snacks and door prizes will be available for participants.

Have questions? Email #KU_WWI Project Leader Sam Moore.

The project is a collaboration among CREES, the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center, European Studies Program, the departments of Germanic Languages & Literatures, History and Slavic Languages & Literatures, University Honors Program, Center for Global & International Studies, Global Awareness Program, Hall Center for the Humanities, KU Libraries, KU Memorial Unions and Spencer Museum of Art.

This project is part of the centennial commemoration of World War I. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs online.



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

Get tickets: http://t.co/YTqcNobkFb MT @liedcenterks : Insights on "Kiss the Fish" from Anthea Scouffas: http://t.co/YlictwH8a9
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


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