Contact

Gavin Young
KU Office of Public Affairs
785-864-7100

Academic Achievement and Access Center names new director

Thu, 04/03/2014

LAWRENCE — Andrew Shoemaker has been named the new director of the Academic Achievement and Access Center (AAAC) at the University of Kansas. Shoemaker has served as associate director since 2009.

The AAAC offers services and programs to support students in their academic success and to enhance their experience at KU. The Center’s mission includes helping students have full and equal access across KU.

“I’m very excited to continue serving the KU community by increasing the Academic Achievement and Access Center’s collaboration across campus and look to further expanding our services to reach more KU students,” said Shoemaker. “As director, my goals will be to develop our newest program, Supplemental Instruction, to continue to build tutoring services and to promote a more inclusive environment for all students by actively promoting the social model of disability.”

The AAAC is one of several Undergraduate Studies programs dedicated to KU's progression and graduation goals. The university has set a goal of a first-year retention rate of 90 percent and a six-year graduation rate of 70 percent.

The AAAC is crucial to attaining those goals through its support of the intellectual development of all individuals by encouraging active participation both in and out of the classroom. The AAAC also works closely with faculty and students to ensure students are able to attain their academic and personal goals.

Among the services offered to students at the AAAC are academic accommodations, tutoring services and learning strategy consultations. One of its newest services, the AAAC Test Center in Strong Hall, is now in its second year. The Test Center administers exams with accommodations and surpassed the 1,000-exam mark in fall 2013.

Shoemaker joined the AAAC in 2003. Prior to joining KU, he worked with students at Arizona State University and the University of Iowa. In 2009, he was recognized with a C.L.A.S.S. award by the Board of Class Officers.

Shoemaker earned a bachelor's degree and master's degree in education from St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Turning rural America healthy: Christie Befort uses $10 million award. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/Bsuek4k9QC
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times