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Lecturer to speak on future of higher education

Thu, 04/17/2014

LAWRENCE — David Krakauer, director of the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, will deliver a lecture titled “The Future of the University” at 8 p.m. today, April 17, at The Commons. Krakauer will then participate in a panel discussion that poses the challenge Dare to Design the University of the Future. That event will be at 10 a.m. Friday, April 18.

As director of the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, a transdisciplinary research institute at the University of Wisconsin, Krakauer has been outspoken about the need for reconceiving the university of the 21st century. An evolutionary theorist and professor of genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Krakauer espouses an experimental approach to blending scientific approaches with those of other disciplines in an effort to generate partnerships that are able to approach problems from multiple perspectives.

Tonight’s lecture will address the challenges inherent in the modern model of the university and pose ideas for change to meet the needs of a society that is advancing technologically and changing economically. Krakauer will discuss the value of truly interdisciplinary work as he relates some of his attempts to address these challenges at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery.

Friday’s panel discussion will be moderated by Sara Thomas Rosen, senior vice provost for Academic Affairs, and will feature Richard De George, University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, Russian & East European Studies and Business Administration; Mabel Rice, Fred and Virginia Merrill Distinguished Professor of Advanced Studies, Speech-Language-Hearing; and Lisa Wolf Wendel, professor of higher education and coordinator of the Higher Education Master’s Degree Program in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.

Krakauer is a graduate of the University of London and Oxford University. He has served as a visiting professor at Princeton University and became a faculty chair at the Santa Fe Insitute in 2009. Krakauer has been a visiting fellow at the Genomics Frontiers Institute at the University of Pennsylvania and a Sage Fellow at the Sage Center for the Study of the Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has authored many mainstream articles, podcasts and videos, and with credit to his nontraditional approach to collaboration and science, he was named among Wired UK’s 2012 Smart List as one of 50 people “who will change the world.”

Both events are free and open to the public.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
RT @srudavsky : More milk news: Drinking it may be good for your brain, @KUnews study finds. http://t.co/KzhkjFtFrs
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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