KU to recognize retirees at luncheon

Thu, 05/08/2014

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas will honor retiring faculty and unclassified staff members with a lunch at noon May 22 in the Kansas Union Ballroom. Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little will recognize the employees during the lunch.

Retirees and one guest will be guests of the chancellor. Cost for additional guests is $20. For reservations, send a check payable to KU to Debra Bia, Chancellor’s Office, 230 Strong Hall.  Reservation deadline is Thursday, May 15.

Retirees:

  • Suzanne Achleitner, Applied English Center, 13 years
  • Gautam Bhattacharyya, economics, 34 years
  • Anne Burgess, Applied English Center, 30 years
  • Elizabeth Campbell, English, 22 years
  • J. William Carswell, architecture, design & planning, 33 years
  • Alison Carter, Dole Institute of Politics, nine years
  • Hugh Catts, speech-language-hearing, 26 years
  • Allan Cigler, political science, 44 years
  • Alicia Ann Clair, music, 38 years
  • Eunice Clifton, Design and Construction Management, five years
  • Robert Cohen, molecular biosciences, 21 years
  • Victoria Corbin, molecular biosciences, 20 years
  • Paul Diedrich, Bureau of Child Research/Life Span Institute, 36 years
  • George Duerksen, education and music therapy, 44 years
  • Maxine Elmore, social welfare, nine years
  • Jolene Fairchild, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, 40 years
  • Ron Francisco, political science, 40 years
  • David Frayer, anthropology, 38 years
  • H. George Frederickson, public affairs & administration, 26 years
  • Fred Galvin, mathematics, 38 years
  • Sandra W. Gautt, special education, 24 years
  • Joyce Generali, pharmacy practice, 28 years
  • Douglas Glasnapp, Center for Research on Learning, 44 years
  • David Gottleib, law, 35 years
  • Kathryn Graves, Libraries, 26 years
  • Slawa Grzymala-Busse, Information Technology Services, 10 years
  • Jerry Hallbauer, Kansas Fire and Rescue Training, 11 years
  • Sally Hayden, Policy Office, 22 years
  • Kathleen Holt, social welfare, 16 years
  • Ruth Hughes, Higuchi Biosciences Center, 39 years
  • John Janzen, anthropology, 42 years
  • Charles Jones, public affairs and administration, 11 years
  • James F. Juola, psychology, 41 years
  • Ralph Knapp, Kansas Geological Survey, 34 years
  • Earle Knowlton, special education, 36 years
  • Hal Kopsa, Facilities Services Storeroom, 31 years
  • Kveta Kugler, Information Technology Services, 26 years
  • Peg Livingood, Design and Construction Management, 13 years
  • Gerald Lubensky, visual art, 44 years
  • Sherrill Martinez, School of Education, eight years
  • Jim Mayo, urban planning, 40 years
  • George F. McCleary Jr., cartography, 39 years
  • Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett, psychology and University Honors Program, 28 years
  • Allan Ray Miller, Achievement and Assessment Institute, 13 years
  • John Nalbandian, public affairs and administration, 38 years
  • Sandy Patti, law, 40 years
  • Frederick Pawlicki, Continuing Education, 22 years
  • Larry Rice, music, 19 years
  • Muriel Drew Saunders, Bureau of Child Research/Life Span Institute, 22 years
  • Judy Sawyer, Human Resources, 34 years
  • Barbara Solberg, Continuing Education, 14 years
  • Chester Sullivan, English, 39 years
  • Tim Van Leer, Lied Center, 12 years
  • Gary Webber, chemistry, 13 years
  • Jeff Weinberg, University Honors Program, 44 years
  • Ron Wroczynski, Kansas Memorial Unions, 12 years
  • Jianghai Xia, Kansas Geological Survey, 19 years.

 

 



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Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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