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Media advisory: Law professor can comment on Supreme Court bankruptcy ruling

Mon, 06/09/2014

LAWRENCE — Stephen Ware, professor of law at the University of Kansas, is available to speak with media about the U.S. Supreme Court ruling today on Executive Benefits Insurance Agency v. Arkison, 12-1200, a bankruptcy case relating to the Constitution’s requirement that some matters be decided by judges with life tenure, which bankruptcy judges lack.

Ware is an expert in bankruptcy law, judicial selection and alternative dispute resolution. His scholarship has been cited by the Supreme Court and in at least 20 other cases. He is the author of two books and more than 30 scholarly articles, and he has testified before both houses of Congress and in court as an expert witness. He has appeared several times on television and radio, and he has been quoted on bankruptcy law in The New York Times and other publications. He coaches the KU Law bankruptcy moot court team as well as teaching all of the law school's courses in bankruptcy and debtor-creditor law.    

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that although bankruptcy judges lack life tenure, they may rule on matters the Constitution otherwise reserved for life-tenured judges if the parties consent to the bankruptcy judge having that power or if the bankruptcy judge proposes a ruling and a life-tenured judge reviews that proposal anew. Ware can explain the ruling and comment on its implications.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Today in #KUhistory : "The Dove" student newspaper makes its debut, 1925. http://t.co/5FpIT2MIKG http://t.co/ciUAvZx65M
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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