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KU receives third consecutive national fundraising award

Mon, 06/30/2014

LAWRENCE — For the third year in a row, the University of Kansas has been nationally recognized for the effectiveness and professionalism of its fundraising programs. The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) chose KU among a select group of universities receiving a 2014 Educational Fundraising Award.

The award represents overall fundraising success among 65 public research/doctoral institutions with endowments of more than $250 million. Other universities receiving the award were the University of California-Berkeley, the University of Virginia and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Among public universities, only KU and the University of California-Berkeley have received this honor three times in the last five years, a distinction that also qualified both universities for the CASE Sustained Excellence in Educational Fundraising Awards.

“Private philanthropy is vital to achieving our bold aspirations, and supports everything from student scholarships and endowed professorships to new facilities,” said Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little. “This is a well-deserved honor for the staff at KU Endowment and recognizes their dedication to connecting the passions of our donors with the priorities of our university as we seek to serve the people of Kansas and the world.”

Dale Seuferling, president of KU Endowment, said it was an honor for KU to have been selected for the CASE fundraising award.

“We are fortunate to have a team of fundraising professionals who work tirelessly with university leaders to share the message of the Far Above campaign with our donors,” Seuferling said.

The Educational Fundraising Award is based on the judges’ analysis of fundraising results for the three-year period ending June 30, 2013. Institutions may not apply for the awards; judges make their selections as part of a blind study of national data. Judges recognize institutions that show solid program growth, breadth in the base of support and other indications of a mature, well-maintained program.

Contributions to KU Endowment for KU and The University of Kansas Hospital reached new heights in the three-year time period: $153.2 million in fiscal 2011, $156.5 million in fiscal 2012 and $174.2 million in fiscal 2013. These gifts count toward Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, a $1.2 billion comprehensive fundraising campaign. To date, giving to Far Above has reached $1.1 billion.

KU Endowment is the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university. The University of Kansas Hospital is a partner in philanthropy with KU Endowment.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Let's talk weight, seriously. Christie Befort changes obesity conversation. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/tPifpXsPvy
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
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Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
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