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Fort Leavenworth commander visits to discuss educational partnerships

Thu, 07/31/2014

LAWRENCE — The commander of the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth visited the University of Kansas last week and met with senior leaders and faculty to discuss future educational partnerships between both institutions.

Lt. Gen. Robert Brown and his deputy, Brig. Gen. Chris Hughes, met with Provost Jeff Vitter and deans of the schools and college Thursday for a roundtable discussion, followed by a review of work being done by KU researchers. The main focus of the discussions centered on the Army’s recent efforts to consolidate its 86 separate training schools nationwide into an “Army University.”

Fort Leavenworth, already identified as the “intellectual center of the Army,” will further increase its strategic importance, which could strengthen ties between KU and Leavenworth. KU already offers specialized onsite programs for Army officers in areas of interagency cooperation, supply chain management and foreign languages, as well as a leadership development program for senior-level officers on campus.

“During the last fourteen years of persistent conflict, the operational requirements of the Army in Iraq and Afghanistan were paramount at the expense of education,” said Mike Denning, director of KU’s Graduate Military Programs. “Army University is an initiative to rebalance education with training and operational experience.”

In the roundtable, participants specifically discussed ways that KU can help the Army train and educate its personnel as it winds down its operations in Afghanistan and possibly downsizes to a much smaller force. Flexible programs with a distance learning component that make it easier for Army officers to more easily obtain graduate degrees and find jobs after they leave the Army were emphasized. The Army is particularly interested in leveraging KU’s expertise in language and culture training as the Army becomes more regionally aligned.

“We want officers who are broadened in the way they think,” Brown said.

Brown added that as the Army’s training transitions to an Army University concept, there will be great potential for partnerships with universities that can adjust to the unique training needs of its personnel.

“We’re at a time of real change in the Army,” Brown said. “Education is increasing for us, and we’re trying to align with universities who can do that.” 



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

World War I left a lasting impression on KU. The 2015 #KUcommonbook is sure to do the same: http://t.co/M8Kizn5FWh http://t.co/n5gLzPx2Q3
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


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26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
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Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
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