Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 26, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 27, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 28, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 29, All day
Thanksgiving Break
Nov. 30, All day

WBB vs. Georgetown
Nov. 23, 02:00 pm
MBB vs. Rider
Nov. 24, 07:00 pm
Volleyball vs. West Virginia
Nov. 26, 06:00 pm
WBB vs. Iona
Nov. 26, 08:00 pm
Volleyball vs. Oklahoma
Nov. 29, 12:00 pm

Contact

David Martin
University of Kansas Medical Center
913-588-1872

Media advisory: Author of 'American Medicine and the Panama Canal' available as 100th anniversary approaches

Wed, 08/13/2014

LAWRENCE — One hundred years ago Friday — Aug. 15, 1914 — the Panama Canal was officially opened by the passing of the SS Ancón. At the time, no single effort in U.S. history had exacted such a price in dollars or in human life.

The American expenditures totaled $352 mllion, far more than the cost of anything built by the U.S. government in the 19th century. Construction of the 48-mile ship canal also cost the lives of about 22,000 workers, many from disease.

Dr. Enrique Chaves-Carballo, professor of pediatrics at the University of Kansas Medical Center, can speak about the efforts of physicians to control yellow fever, malaria and other tropical diseases during the excavation of the canal.

Chaves-Carballo is the author of the recent book “American Medicine and the Panama Canal,” a collection of articles published in the journal Proceedings of the Canal Zone Medical Association (1908 to 1927). Chaves-Carballo also helped to curate an exhibit, “A Triumph of American Medicine: William Gorgas, Ancon Hospital and the Panama Canal,” at the Clendening History of Medicine Library at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City, Kansas. A U.S. Army physician, Gorgas was the chief sanitary officer on the canal project.

To set up an interview with Chaves-Carballo, contact David Martin at 913-588-1872 or dmartin3@kumc.edu.



KU in the news
U.S. News & World ReportThu, 11/13/2014
One in five of Kansas foster children are in foster care because of issues related to caregiver substance abuse. To help agencies across the state and strengthen affected families, researchers in the School of Social Welfare have secured a five-year, $2.9 million grant from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families. “We seek to improve family functioning in order to enhance the children’s well-being, safety and permanency,” said Susana Mariscal, a leader of the project. Read more: http://bit.ly/1sd0e2u Tags: #KUcommunities #FosterCare #SubstanceAbuse University of Kansas School of Social Welfare
The 19th annual Carnival of Chemistry is today from 1-4pm in Malott Hall. http://t.co/tKxxOrdR44
Inside KU: Protein research, biodiesel fuel, and KU's Bioscience & Technology Business Center "Inside KU" takes a look at how the expanded Bioscience & Technology Business Center (http://bit.ly/1zzPvrw) brings a number of beneficial services to small start-ups, Fortune 500 companies, and everything in between. Also: A KU startup at the BTBC, KanPro, is producing proteins for research in medicine, biotechnology, and life sciences (See http://bit.ly/1DSY3s9). KU Innovation and Collaboration focuses on turning the university’s research into industry (See http://bit.ly/ZTOKZF). The "Feedstock to Tailpipe Initiative" grows algae to provide a sustainable source for biodiesel fuel (See http://bit.ly/1oPRovz). Undergraduate Research Awards allow students to explore their fields deeper (See http://bit.ly/KUcugr). **The Time Warner Cable Sports Network's "Inside KU" is hosted by Jeannie Hodes.**


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times