Contact

Erinn Barcomb-Peterson
KU News Service
785-864-8858

University community remembers contributions of Floyd Horowitz

Fri, 08/15/2014

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas community is mourning the death of Floyd Horowitz, retired professor of English. Horowitz, 84, died of complications of Alzheimer’s disease Aug. 9 in New York City.

Horowitz joined the university as an English instructor in 1961. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1963, to associate professor in 1967, then to professor in 1973. In the mid-1960s he began exploring uses of computing technology in the humanities. For a year he held a joint appointment with the then-named KU Computing Center and later in the Department of Computer Science.

He was a founding editor of Computer Studies, the first scholarly journal dedicated to computer use in the humanities. He was acting chairman of the Department of Computer Science from 1972 to 1975. He retired in 1993.

“I join the KU community in offering my sympathies to Floyd Horowitz’s family and friends,” Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little said. “We remember him as a scholar who adeptly straddled the humanities and the sciences, and as a friend to the university.”

For more than 20 years, he and his wife, Frances Degen Horowitz, have had a Hall Center for the Humanities annual lecture named in their honor —  the Frances and Floyd Horowitz Lecture Series, devoted to issues related to our multicultural society. Frances Horowitz is a former KU vice chancellor for research and graduate studies at KU.

Both individually and as a couple, the Horowitzes gifted items to the university’s Spencer Research Library.

“Floyd Horowitz was a good-humored and versatile colleague who taught a variety of American literature courses,” said James Carothers, professor of English. “He was among the first of the university’s humanists to see the vast potential for computer applications to our society as a whole and to the university, the humanities in particular. He took leadership in the founding of the Department of Computer Science and in the application of its work throughout the academy. Although he left KU in 1993, his influence remains.”

Funeral services were Aug. 13 in New York City. 



President Barack Obama visited the University of Kansas on Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015 for a public event at the Anschutz Sports Pavilion. Read more about the event here: bit.ly/POTUSatKU The President was introduced by KU senior Alyssa Cole, following remarks by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little. He discussed themes from his 2015 State of the Union address, including the importance of affordable higher education and child care to individual success and national prosperity. You can watch the White House's video of the event (http://bit.ly/1EBSWg5), and the White House has also provided a transcript of the president's remarks (http://1.usa.gov/1yMWJqy). #POTUSatKU
Do you think KU excels at innovation & economic development? Help us get an important @APLU _News designation: http://t.co/O8iSGG64tY
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times