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Christi Davis
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
785-864-8118

'Aeneid' to take high school teachers, KU faculty on epic journey

Thu, 09/04/2014

LAWRENCE – For more than 20 centuries, Latin literature has spun some of Western civilization’s most epic tales, legends and myths. Essential to a Latin education is Virgil’s "Aeneid," a poem that has influenced other great works of literature, Western culture and now a colloquium at the University of Kansas.

A daylong high school teachers’ mini-conference will explore several facets of the epic poem, written between 29 and 19 B.C. The Department of Classics is hosting the conference as an opportunity to support the study of classics in the state.

“We want to provide resources to those who do so much for the study of the ancient world in Kansas,” said Tara Welch, chair of the department. “Plus, the 'Aeneid' is a cornerstone of classics study and a piece rich with controversy and points of discussion.”

The Oliver Phillips Colloquium is free to all high school teachers. Sessions will be led by KU faculty and librarians and guest speaker Randy Ganiban, professor of classics at Middlebury College.  

Subjects covered include perception and deception in the "Aeneid." The seminar will include a visit to the Spencer Research Library at KU to see manuscripts and ancient maps. Teachers will also have opportunities to discuss classroom instruction techniques and other offerings in Latin studies programs, such as Advanced Placement exams and textbooks.

The seminar begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at the Lawrence campus and will include lunch. More information about the program, including registration, is available by contacting tswelch@ku.edu or 785-864-2395.

The colloquium is named for the late classics professor Oliver Phillips in honor of his passion for teaching Latin. Phillips taught at KU from 1964 to 1994.

The Department of Classics is part of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The College encourages learning without boundaries in its more than 50 departments, programs and centers. Through innovative research and teaching, the College emphasizes interdisciplinary education, global awareness and experiential learning. The College is KU's broadest, most diverse academic unit.



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