Lecture to explore assassination that sparked WWI

Fri, 03/28/2014

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Ursula Rothrock
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
785-864-8118

LAWRENCE — On June 28, 1914, the heir to the Habsburg throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sophie, were murdered by a Serbian nationalist. This gruesome event triggered a war never before seen: a “total war” now known as World War I.

Yet, such an assassination was not unique. The king and queen of Serbia and the king of Italy had been murdered about a decade before, and the prime ministers of Bulgaria and Russia had been assassinated even more recently. What made this assassination incendiary enough to start a war?

Nathaniel Wood, associate professor of history at the University of Kansas, will explore that question and more in his lecture “All for you, Franz? From the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand to Total War.” The lecture will be at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 3, in the Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium.

Using historical research, newspaper reports and images, and artwork from the Spencer Museum of Art, this lecture will look into the circumstances surrounding the event that helped trigger WWI and how total war affected society once the conflict began. The lecture will be followed by a reception and viewing of art from the WWI era. The event is free and open to the public.

Wood’s research addresses the challenges and opportunities that came with industrialization and modernization in the 19th and early 20th centuries in East Central Europe. His first book is about the rapid urbanization of Cracow until 1915, while his current project explores cycling, motoring and aviation in the Polish lands from 1885 to 1939.

Sponsors of the event include European Studies; Spencer Museum of Art; Department of History; Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures; Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies; University Honors Program; Hall Center for the Humanities; and Peace & Conflict Studies in the Humanities & Western Civilization Program.

The lecture is part of the KU centennial commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs at http://european.ku.edu/wwi-tribute.



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Did you know the Spooner-Thayer Art Museum was KU’s first art museum? It opened more than 50 years before the Spencer Museum of Art that we know today. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1oKmgXn Tags: Spencer Museum of Art #KUtbt #TBT #KUdiscoveries #Art #Museum #Gallery #VisualArt Photo credit: University Archives in Spencer Research Library.

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Poet offers insights to Jayhawk experience through wordplay "Welcome to KU. Where questions rest, in stacks of answers from the past. …" Listen to Topher Enneking, a spoken word poet and former KU football player, as he weaves the experience of KU and its traditions through this storytelling and wordplay performance. Learn more about KU traditions at http://www.ku.edu/about/traditions/. Welcome to KU. Where questions rest in stacks of answers from the past. Where dreams crawl out of bed And learn to walk Uphill both ways. Where freshmen stand on stilts And hang from the rafters, While the wheat waves In a fieldhouse Where the Phog rolls in Helping us to see Through the past into the future. Haunting hosts giving handouts in a heritage Too heavy to grasp til you add to it. So it may be born anew, Allowing our boots to stand in the ash of oppression’s hate But shine bright as the sun While war cries of warriors past Ring in our ears long after their battles are won. Memorials telling time, “you don’t have to stand still.” Because the top of the world Is just up that Hill. Where our natural history is an awe-struck echo Of world’s fair and equal Past, present and future, prelude and sequel. Where our flags fly above planes. Where we build in chalks that can’t be erased. Stone edifices made to last So you would walk Past their doors, down their halls And let your voice fill their room. Because only in empty silence can destruction loom. So stand tall. Wrap your arms around this crowd Sing our alma mater and sing it out loud. Let your voice sing in chorus and reach other nations Beckoning new Jayhawks to spark new collaborations Because you are the mortar that will hold these walls upright. Your future Your dreams are why Jayhawks did fight For the tradition before you Was merely prelude For what will come next now that you’re at KU.


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