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Austin Falley
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Media advisory: Finance professor to testify before U.S. Senate banking committee

Wed, 07/16/2014

LAWRENCE — University of Kansas finance professor Bob DeYoung will speak today before the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Protections.

His remarks are part of a hearing titled “What Makes a Bank Systemically Important?” and are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. CST today, July 16.

DeYoung will provide testimony based on his research in commercial banking as well as how regulators can address sources of systemic risk under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

DeYoung was invited to testify by U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, chairman of the subcommittee.

DeYoung is the Capitol Federal Distinguished Professor in Financial Markets and Institutions at the KU School of Business. He serves as co-editor of the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking.

He directs KU’s Center of Banking Excellence, and he is a leading scholar on performance, practice and regulation in the banking industry.

Media inquires can be sent to Austin Falley at 785-864-3852 or afalley@ku.edu. A PDF of DeYoung's formal remarks can be found online.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Turning rural America healthy: Christie Befort uses $10 million award. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/Bsuek4k9QC
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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