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Kathy Pryor
University Theatre
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University Theatre announces auditions for diverse spring season

Mon, 11/18/2013

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas University Theatre has announced November auditions for spring 2014 productions. Auditions will take place from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Monday, Nov. 18, in Murphy Hall to cast roles in four plays and one musical.

Auditions for “Much Ado About Nothing,” “The Boor,” “Antic Disposition: Variations of Haml3t” and “The Other Shore” will take place in 209 Murphy Hall. Auditions for the musical “Over Here!” will be in 354 Murphy Hall.

Katherine Pryor, University Theatre managing director, said she is excited for fresh talent at auditions after a large turnout of new students in August. According to Pryor, large ensembles of the spring productions will provide more opportunities for students looking to get involved with the University Theatre. “This spring season includes multiple opportunities for students to conquer challenging, diverse work.” Pryor said. “We’ve got Shakespeare, a Chinese translation, a musical and everything in-between.”

Auditions are open to all undergraduates enrolled in at least six hours and all graduate students enrolled in at least one hour, regardless of major. Auditioning students should sign up online for audition times and must bring a current headshot and prepare two contrasting pieces, totaling three minutes. Students auditioning for “Over Here!” must prepare 32-bars of a musical theatre song and a one-minute monologue. Students auditioning for both the general call and the musical “Over Here!” must sign up for two audition times. An accompanist will be provided and scripts are currently available in 317 Murphy.

Invitation-only callbacks will be Tuesday, Nov. 19, and Wednesday, Nov. 20. Callback lists will be posted by noon each day in the Green Room in Murphy Hall and online. Cast lists will be posted by noon Friday, Nov. 22.



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