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Laurie Harrison
Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation
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Vermont joins KU-led initiative to improve testing for students with disabilities

Wed, 01/16/2013

LAWRENCE — Vermont has joined the Dynamic Learning Maps Alternate Assessment Consortium, a multistate initiative led by the Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation at the University of Kansas.

Vermont joins the DLM Consortium’s 13 other states: Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

The DLM Consortium is developing the Dynamic Learning Maps Alternate Assessment, a computer-based assessment for the 1 percent of the K-12 public school student population with significant cognitive disabilities for whom, even with accommodations, general state assessments are not appropriate. Therefore, these students take an alternate assessment.

The DLM assessment system is being designed to support student learning by having assessment tasks model good instruction. Assessment is embedded in teachers’ instruction given throughout the school year in ways that allow the Dynamic Learning Map to help teachers teach better. It will be implemented in the DLM Consortium states during the 2014-2015 school year.
 
“We are happy to join the other DLM states in the development of authentic assessment tools to inform teaching and learning in Vermont," said Armando Vilaseca, Vermont education commissioner. “Collaboration amongst states will increase professional development opportunities for our educators. I am a believer that collaboration, the sharing of best practices and resources, will strengthen our education system.”

“We welcome Vermont to the DLM Consortium during this exciting time in the history of educational testing,” said Neal Kingston, DLM project director and Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation director. “I fully expect that the addition of Vermont to the Consortium will help ensure we develop a high-quality assessment system that will support student learning and teacher instruction.”

DLM is funded through a five-year-grant awarded in late 2010 by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. Its $22 million grant award was the largest in KU history at that time. The DLM Consortium is one of two multistate consortia to receive federal grants to create a next-generation alternate assessment linked to Common Core State Standards in math and English language arts for the 1 percent population.

Learn more about DLM here.

DLM is led by the Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation, a nationally recognized center specializing in large-scale assessment and online test delivery systems. For more than 30 years, the center has developed cutting-edge testing programs and technology tools, including the Kansas Assessment Program, Dynamic Learning Maps, Kansas Writing Instruction and Education Tool, and Adaptive Reading Motivation Measures.
                                      



With graduation just a few months away, James Robert Wilson, senior in sport management, took this photo of the Memorial Campanile while looking forward to KU commencement traditions. After walking through the campanile and down the Hill in May, Wilson plans to take a summer road trip, then pursue a master’s degree and help coach track and field. Wilson, who is from Abilene, Kansas, says, "Coming to KU has put me in contact with people from all over the world and opened my eyes to many new cultures.” His advice to all Jayhawks: "Make the most of your time here by trying new things.” Our advice to graduating Jayhawks: Enjoy your last semester. Where will your time at KU take you? Tags: #exploreKU #Graduation University of Kansas School of Education

#KUresearch targets pathogens that kill children, plague ranchers & leave U.S. open to attack.http://t.co/LRCcCQn9c8 http://t.co/GQqkomCBBb
KU welcomes President Obama Jan. 22, 2015, was a historic day on the Hill: President Barack Obama visited the University of Kansas campus (http://bit.ly/POTUSatKU), the first sitting president to do so in a century. More than 7,000 people — including many students and faculty who had spent hours in line to get tickets for the event — packed inside KU’s Anschutz Sports Pavilion to hear the president speak. Welcomed by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little with “Barack Chalk, Jayhawk!” Obama told the gathering “I’m a Kansas guy,” because his mother was from Wichita and grandparents were from Augusta and El Dorado. In his 35-minute talk, the president discussed themes (see official White House transcript http://1.usa.gov/1yMWJqy) from his 2015 State of the Union address, including his goal to lower the cost of attending college.


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