Nominations sought for Class of 2013 awards

Wed, 01/30/2013

LAWRENCE — The University Awards committee is now accepting nominations for the Class of 2013 University Awards.

The Class of 2013 University Awards, formerly known as the Chancellor’s Student Awards, are among the most prestigious awards presented at the University of Kansas. These awards were established to recognize students who embody service excellence, dedication or whose academic achievements remain stellar.

Each recipient is recognized during a surprise in-class presentation, and the award recipients’ photos are included in the Commencement Program.

The Class of 2013 University Awards are designated for graduating seniors, with the exception of the Rusty Leffel Concerned Student Award, which can be bestowed to any classification of student.

The online nomination form and award criteria are available online. Each nominee will be informed of his/her nomination and will be required to complete an application. 

The deadline for nominations is 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, and student applications are due 5 p.m. Feb. 15.

See more information here. Questions regarding the nomination process can be directed to Lindsay Hamm at 785-864-4060 or by email.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
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Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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