Media advisory: Professor available to speak about Associated Press policy on same-sex marriage language

Fri, 02/15/2013

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KU News Service
785-864-8860

LAWRENCE — David Guth, associate professor of journalism at the University of Kansas, is available to speak about the Associated Press’ decision to not use the terms husband and wife for same-sex couples with media covering the issue.

Earlier this week, an internal Associated Press memo was leaked stating the news organization would not use the terms husband and wife in reference to legally married same-sex couples. It was later amended to state they would use the terms if married couples used them themselves or in direct quotes. The policy has drawn criticism from a number of gay-rights organizations.

Guth, who teaches journalism ethics, among other courses, is an expert in crisis communications, political communication and public relations history. He has authored numerous books and academic articles, including “Public Relations: A Values-Driven Approach,” co-authored with KU journalism professor Charles Marsh.

To set up an interview, contact Mike Krings, KU News Service, 785-864-8860, or by email.
 



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