Forty researchers win KU 'Leading Light' Award

Thu, 03/07/2013

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Kevin Boatright
Office of Research
785-864-7240

LAWRENCE – The University of Kansas recognized some of its most productive researchers recently, conferring the Leading Light Award on 40 faculty and staff at the Lawrence campus.

The 40 are principal investigators or co-principal investigators on externally funded grants of  $1 million or more awarded during the 2012 fiscal year. Recipients were recognized at a luncheon, where each received an inscribed bronze sunflower symbolic of Kansas and their leadership in research.

This is the second year of the Leading Light Award program.  It was established at KU by Jeff Vitter, provost and executive vice chancellor. “By contributing to the research enterprise at KU in a major way,” said Vitter, “these individuals and teams serve as leading lights and role models for others.”

At the ceremony, recipients of the awards had an opportunity to describe their project. Past recipients of the award also attended the luncheon.

“KU researchers in all fields are competitive with the best in the country,” said event co-host Steve Warren, vice chancellor for research and graduate studies. “Success in obtaining large grants is just one indicator of that, and this recognition is well-deserved.”

The 2013 recipients of the KU Leading Light Award:

  • Brian Ackley, Molecular Biosciences
  • Mizuki Azuma, Molecular Biosciences
  • James Basham, Special Education
  • Cory Berkland, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Cindy Berrie, Chemistry
  • Brian Blagg, Medicinal Chemistry
  • Kyle Camarda, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
  • Karin Lee Chang-Rios, Institute for Educational Research and Public Service
  • Keith Chauvin, School of Business
  • Francie Christopher, Institute for Educational Research and Public Service
  • Edith Clowes, Slavic Languages and Literature
  • John Colombo, Psychology, Life Span Institute
  • Prajna Dhar, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
  • John Doveton, Kansas Geological Survey
  • Dietrich Earnhart, Economics
  • Jianwen Fang, Molecular Structures Group
  • Jeannine Goetz, Dietetics and Nutrition, School of Health Professions
  • Diana Greer, Center for Research on Learning
  • Michael Johnson, Chemistry
  • John Karanicolas, Center for Bioinformatics, Molecular Biosciences
  • Sarah Kieweg, Mechanical Engineering
  • Jennifer Laurence, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Young-Jin Lee, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
  • Craig Lunte, Chemistry
  • Danny Marfatia, Physics and Astronomy
  • Matthew Mayo, Biostatistics
  • Douglas McKay, Physics and Astronomy
  • Edward Meyen, Special Education
  • Richard Miller, Kansas Geological Survey
  • Anil Misra, Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering
  • Kerry Newell, Kansas Geological Survey
  • John Ralston, Physics and Astronomy
  • Sean Smith, Special Education
  • Debra Sullivan, Dietetics and Nutrition, School of Health Professions
  • Michael Taylor, Geology
  • David Volkin, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Jane Wegner, Speech-Language-Hearing
  • Todd Williams, Molecular Structures Group
  • Judy Wu, Physics and Astronomy
  • Qiang Ye, Bioengineering Research Center.

 



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