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Forty researchers win KU 'Leading Light' Award

Thu, 03/07/2013

LAWRENCE – The University of Kansas recognized some of its most productive researchers recently, conferring the Leading Light Award on 40 faculty and staff at the Lawrence campus.

The 40 are principal investigators or co-principal investigators on externally funded grants of  $1 million or more awarded during the 2012 fiscal year. Recipients were recognized at a luncheon, where each received an inscribed bronze sunflower symbolic of Kansas and their leadership in research.

This is the second year of the Leading Light Award program.  It was established at KU by Jeff Vitter, provost and executive vice chancellor. “By contributing to the research enterprise at KU in a major way,” said Vitter, “these individuals and teams serve as leading lights and role models for others.”

At the ceremony, recipients of the awards had an opportunity to describe their project. Past recipients of the award also attended the luncheon.

“KU researchers in all fields are competitive with the best in the country,” said event co-host Steve Warren, vice chancellor for research and graduate studies. “Success in obtaining large grants is just one indicator of that, and this recognition is well-deserved.”

The 2013 recipients of the KU Leading Light Award:

  • Brian Ackley, Molecular Biosciences
  • Mizuki Azuma, Molecular Biosciences
  • James Basham, Special Education
  • Cory Berkland, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Cindy Berrie, Chemistry
  • Brian Blagg, Medicinal Chemistry
  • Kyle Camarda, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
  • Karin Lee Chang-Rios, Institute for Educational Research and Public Service
  • Keith Chauvin, School of Business
  • Francie Christopher, Institute for Educational Research and Public Service
  • Edith Clowes, Slavic Languages and Literature
  • John Colombo, Psychology, Life Span Institute
  • Prajna Dhar, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
  • John Doveton, Kansas Geological Survey
  • Dietrich Earnhart, Economics
  • Jianwen Fang, Molecular Structures Group
  • Jeannine Goetz, Dietetics and Nutrition, School of Health Professions
  • Diana Greer, Center for Research on Learning
  • Michael Johnson, Chemistry
  • John Karanicolas, Center for Bioinformatics, Molecular Biosciences
  • Sarah Kieweg, Mechanical Engineering
  • Jennifer Laurence, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Young-Jin Lee, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
  • Craig Lunte, Chemistry
  • Danny Marfatia, Physics and Astronomy
  • Matthew Mayo, Biostatistics
  • Douglas McKay, Physics and Astronomy
  • Edward Meyen, Special Education
  • Richard Miller, Kansas Geological Survey
  • Anil Misra, Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering
  • Kerry Newell, Kansas Geological Survey
  • John Ralston, Physics and Astronomy
  • Sean Smith, Special Education
  • Debra Sullivan, Dietetics and Nutrition, School of Health Professions
  • Michael Taylor, Geology
  • David Volkin, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Jane Wegner, Speech-Language-Hearing
  • Todd Williams, Molecular Structures Group
  • Judy Wu, Physics and Astronomy
  • Qiang Ye, Bioengineering Research Center.

 



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

In his new book “Food Utopias: Reimagining Citizenship, Ethics and Community,” #KUprof talks alternative agriculture. http://t.co/lJpNcBCsHr
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times