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Professor recognized for impact in applied mathematics

Thu, 03/07/2013

LAWRENCE – An international organization dedicated to furthering the development of applied mathematics and computational science has recognized a professor of mathematics at the University of Kansas for his contributions.

Tyrone Duncan, a professor at KU since 1974, is the recipient of the 2013 W.T. and Idalia Reid Prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The award honors individuals for their research or contributions to differential equations and control theory. Duncan will give the Reid Prize Lecture this July at the SIAM Annual Meeting in San Diego.

The selection committee noted Duncan has made “fundamental contributions to nonlinear filtering, stochastic control, and the relation between probability and geometry." These contributions include a probabilistic approach to the Index Theorem and theta functions and stochastic control and filtering in manifolds. Applications of such work can be found in the areas of engineering, science and finance.

Duncan is a renowned scholar who has shared his work in scores of presentations worldwide and more than 200 publications. Other recognition includes teaching and research awards from KU, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellow and International Federation of Automatic Control Fellow, and a series of four issues of Communications in Information and Systems devoted to celebrating his 65th birthday.

Duncan completed his doctorate and master’s degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University. He earned a bachelor’s in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has conducted research supported by grants from organizations including the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Air Force and the Army.

SIAM is an international organization of more than 13,000 individual members. Almost 500 academic, manufacturing, research and development, service and consulting, government and military organizations worldwide are institutional members.

The Department of Mathematics is part of KU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, which encourages learning without boundaries in its more than 50 departments, programs and centers. Through innovative research and teaching, the College emphasizes interdisciplinary education, global awareness and experiential learning. It is the broadest and most diverse academic unit at KU.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
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Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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