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Jen Humphrey
KU Natural History Museum
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University mourns death of Professor Larry Martin

Mon, 03/11/2013

LAWRENCE — University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little and Leonard Krishtalka, director of the Biodiversity Institute, issued the following statements on the death of Professor Larry Martin:
 
Gray-Little: “The University of Kansas and the discipline of paleontology have lost a great voice. Larry Martin’s contributions to his field cannot be overstated, and he leaves a vast legacy both in his students and in his research. On behalf of the entire KU community, I offer the deepest condolences to his loved ones and colleagues.”
 
Krishtalka: “Larry’s research expertise and interests were enormous, ranging from the evolution and behavior of dinosaurs, extinct sea monsters and fossil birds, to the anatomy and history of saber-toothed cats, to the changing environments of North America during the past 30 million years and how animals adapted to those changes. KU’s program in paleontology is consistently ranked among the top three in the nation, in no small measure due to Martin, who, for 40 years, established the university as the best of the best in research and education in paleobiology.”
 
Martin, 69, died Saturday, March 9, after a long illness.

He served as a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and a curator in vertebrate paleontology at KU since 1972.  He authored more than 170 scientific papers in the most prestigious journals and books, and he was the recipient of numerous research grants from the National Science Foundation, National Geographic, NASA and other agencies and societies. He trained many students at KU, paleobiologists who are now scientific leaders in the People’s Republic of China, South Korea and universities worldwide.
 
Martin is survived by his wife, Jean, and two daughters. Services are pending.



Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

Class outside… in January. Yes, please. #exploreKU (📷: insta samh131) http://t.co/FsKGMcomAG
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


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