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Jen Humphrey
KU Natural History Museum
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University mourns death of Professor Larry Martin

Mon, 03/11/2013

LAWRENCE — University of Kansas Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little and Leonard Krishtalka, director of the Biodiversity Institute, issued the following statements on the death of Professor Larry Martin:
 
Gray-Little: “The University of Kansas and the discipline of paleontology have lost a great voice. Larry Martin’s contributions to his field cannot be overstated, and he leaves a vast legacy both in his students and in his research. On behalf of the entire KU community, I offer the deepest condolences to his loved ones and colleagues.”
 
Krishtalka: “Larry’s research expertise and interests were enormous, ranging from the evolution and behavior of dinosaurs, extinct sea monsters and fossil birds, to the anatomy and history of saber-toothed cats, to the changing environments of North America during the past 30 million years and how animals adapted to those changes. KU’s program in paleontology is consistently ranked among the top three in the nation, in no small measure due to Martin, who, for 40 years, established the university as the best of the best in research and education in paleobiology.”
 
Martin, 69, died Saturday, March 9, after a long illness.

He served as a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and a curator in vertebrate paleontology at KU since 1972.  He authored more than 170 scientific papers in the most prestigious journals and books, and he was the recipient of numerous research grants from the National Science Foundation, National Geographic, NASA and other agencies and societies. He trained many students at KU, paleobiologists who are now scientific leaders in the People’s Republic of China, South Korea and universities worldwide.
 
Martin is survived by his wife, Jean, and two daughters. Services are pending.



When looking to tackle the issue of obesity in rural America, where should we start? The answer is not what you might think. Empathy, says Christie Befort, an associate professor at KU who has just won a $10 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to investigate solutions to rural obesity. Many physicians are embarrassed talking about weight—especially in a small town where everybody knows each other, Befort says. By providing obesity treatment options in rural primary care, she plans to start a conversation, and maybe a revolution, in rural health care. For more details on Befort's efforts, check out the 2015 Chancellor's Report: http://bit.ly/1D5A5MO and her video: http://bit.ly/1C5xYZa Tags: #KUcommunities #Obesity #Health #Rural #Midwest Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute - PCORI

#exploreKU with music - @wethegriswolds played an afternoon acoustic set for students in the @KUunion today. ❤️🎶💙 http://t.co/IwQoKDokLn
Explore KU: Experience a KU Men's Basketball tradition It’s explosive. It’s dramatic. It’s intimidating. It’s a KU tradition (see more at http://bit.ly/KUtraditions) simply known as the Confetti Toss. But it creates a primal eruption of fan enthusiasm at the opening of every KU men’s basketball game at Allen Fieldhouse. It starts as the visiting team is introduced on court. The KU student section is visibly bored and unimpressed. The entire section under the north basket holds up University Daily Kansans — making the point they’d rather read the newspaper than even look at the other team. They shake and rustle the student newspapers. Then the moment they were waiting for arrives — the Jayhawks enter the court. All Rock Chalk breaks loose. Newspapers, confetti and thousands of thundering voices soar into already charged atmosphere of KU’s hallowed basketball arena. The confetti hits its high point, near the banner on the north wall reading “Pay Heed, All Who Enter: Beware of the Phog.” And the confetti rains back into the stands, onto the court and into the memories of all at hand. It’s time to play.


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