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Joe Monaco
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KU to host annual symposium on the scholarship of diversity

Mon, 03/25/2013

LAWRENCE – Two nationally prominent education leaders will headline the third annual Spring Symposium on the Scholarship of Diversity from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, at the Kansas Union.

Nancy Cantor, chancellor and president of Syracuse University, will join James Johnson, distinguished professor of management at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, to deliver keynote speeches at the symposium, which is designed to showcase diversity as an important area of scholarship and research. The symposium also includes breakout sessions led by KU faculty and staff from various units and academic departments related to diversity.

“Diversity is a crucial area of scholarship and research, particularly for those studying or committed to issues related to race, gender, culture, class, sexual orientation and disability,” said Fred Rodriguez, KU vice provost for diversity and equity. “We’re thrilled to have Chancellor Cantor and Professor Johnson – two nationally renowned educators – joining us in Lawrence to help us explore this topic."

The symposium begins at 8 a.m. with remarks from Rodriguez, KU Provost Jeff Vitter and KU School of Business Dean Neeli Bendapudi, who will introduce Johnson for his address, titled “Six Disruptive Demographic Trends: Implications for the U.S. and Higher Education.” Breakout sessions continue throughout the morning until noon, when KU Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little introduces Cantor for a keynote address titled “Higher Education’s Public Mission: Diversity and Innovation Together.”

The symposium is hosted by the KU Office of Diversity & Equity, which works to coordinate, communicate and clarify KU's continued commitment to diversity in its faculty, staff, students and academic program offerings.

“A hallmark of a premier university is one in which all students, faculty and staff learn to live and interact in harmony within an increasingly complex and diverse society,” Rodriguez said. “An educational experience that is respectful, appreciative and that accepts multiple perspectives and viewpoints is essential. In essence, diversity matters.”

The event is free and open to all KU faculty, staff and graduate students, but registration is required. To register, and to download a full symposium brochure, visit www.diversity.ku.edu/symposium



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