Transit service changes effective Aug. 1

Mon, 07/29/2013

LAWRENCE — City of Lawrence and University of Kansas bus systems will implement their annual service changes on Thursday, Aug. 1. Service changes are intended to improve access to the city and campus, adjust service frequency and make the best use of resources available.

“Ensuring that our riders receive timely and quality service is very important to us,” said Robert Nugent, transit administrator. “Making changes that benefit the overall system is necessary after evaluating routes throughout the year.”

One of the biggest changes this year is Night Line, a new late-night bus service, which started June 1. Buses operate from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Monday – Saturday, and riders call in advance to schedule their trips. Night Line is a one-year pilot project. Based on the success of the project, it may be continued after that time.

Another change already in effect is the relocation of the downtown transfer center. Routes 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10 and 11 are now stopping in the 700 block of Vermont instead of the 900 block of New Hampshire, where construction is under way.

Additional changes to bus routes this year are as follows:

  • Route 1: Minor changes to routing.         
  • Route 5: Minor changes to routing and timing.
  • Route 11: Minor changes to routing and timing.
  • Route 29: Minor changes to timing.
  • Route 33: Route was combined with Route 36, so the same areas will still be served.

More details are available in the new printed Transit Guide, which includes route and schedule information for both city and university bus routes. Guides are available on buses, at City Hall, the Lawrence Public Library, grocery stores and across the KU campus. To get help planning a route or for more information, visit www.lawrencetransit.org or call 864-4644.



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