Students invited to attend Part-Time Job Fair on Aug. 26

Thu, 08/22/2013

Contact

Katrina Zaremba
University Career Center
785-864-7648

LAWRENCE — The University Career Center at the University of Kansas will host a Part-Time Job Fair from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Aug. 26, in the Kansas Union fourth-floor lobby. KU students who want to work part-time during the school year will have the opportunity to visit with KU employers and off-campus employers from the Lawrence and Kansas City area about job opportunities. For a list of participating employers, visit career.ku.edu.  The fair is designed to simplify the search for a part-time job.

The University Career Center is located in 110 Burge Union. Part-time job vacancies can be found at career.ku.edu/ptjobs. This site is updated daily and provides information about both on-campus and off-campus employment opportunities for students. 



This past week, new Jayhawks moved in and started their first semester at KU. Madisen Pool, a freshman in computer engineering, captured one of his first sunrises on the Hill. With a fresh start, and a feeling of accomplishment for starting college, Pool thought this view was a great reminder to enjoy life. We asked Pool what his advice would be to his fellow new Jayhawks and he said, "make your time here at the university memorable. Have fun, do something you’ve always wanted to do, meet new people, and most importantly get the most out of your experience and shape your life the way you want it to be. Rock Chalk!" We couldn't agree more. Rock Chalk, Madisen! Show us your new experiences with the hashtag, #exploreKU.

KU physicists doing groundbreaking work at the Large Hadron Collider. http://t.co/blsTaCXfG5 #KUfacts #KUdiscoveries #CERN #physics
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One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
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46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
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$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
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