KU research plays role in Greenland canyon discovery

Fri, 08/30/2013

LAWRENCE — Researchers at the University of Kansas played a significant role in providing data that reveal the existence of a massive canyon buried under miles of ice in Greenland. The discovery appears in Friday’s edition of the journal Science.

The article, authored by Jonathan Bamber at the University of Bristol in England, maps a canyon in Greenland that is 470 miles long and twice as deep in places as the Grand Canyon. Because the ice sheet is as much as two miles thick, it had gone unnoticed for millennia.

Prasad Gogineni, distinguished professor of electrical engineering and computer science at KU and director of the NSF Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), said that data collected by radars developed at KU and used in earth science missions funded by the National Science Foundation and NASA over the past two decades were essential to researchers being able to reveal this geological feature. Data collection has picked up in recent years with the KU-designed Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS), a critical instrument addition to NASA's ongoing Operation IceBridge missions as well as to ongoing NSF polar studies. Students, staff and faculty affiliated with CReSIS were involved in collecting and processing much of the data used in the research paper, and additional data products, Gogineni said.

CReSIS, which is headquartered at KU, develops ice-penetrating radars and unmanned aircraft to study changes in earth’s polar ice sheets. The data collected by KU researchers and CReSIS partner institutions are used by KU and others around the world to better predict climate change and the effect melting ice sheets have on sea level.

For interviews contact CReSIS Deputy Director Carl Leuschen, associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, 785-864-7723, leuschen@ku.edu.

For more information about CReSIS, go to www.cresis.ku.edu.



Travel to New York and perform on one of the greatest stages in the nation? KU's Wind Ensemble did just that. In March 2013, the University of Kansas Wind Ensemble made the trip of a lifetime to perform the world premiere of composer Mohammed Fairouz’s Symphony No. 4, In the Shadow of No Towers at Carnegie Hall. http://bit.ly/1nXMXr9 Tags: University of Kansas Wind Ensemble KU School of Music Carnegie Hall #KUdifference #music #symphony
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