Guth will not return to classroom this year

Thu, 10/24/2013

LAWRENCE — University of Kansas Associate Professor David Guth, who was put on indefinite administrative leave Sept. 20 after posting comments on his personal Twitter account that caused disruptions in the university’s learning environment, will not return to classroom duties this year, the university announced today.

In place of teaching, Guth has been assigned additional non-classroom responsibilities in the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications for the remainder of the semester, including various service and administrative assignments. Those assignments will be completed away from campus to the greatest extent possible.

The decision, made by Provost Jeffrey Vitter and approved by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little, is based on the recommendation of a seven-member committee of faculty and staff, assembled at the chancellor’s request. The committee was asked to assess the current environment and recommend whether Guth could return from administrative leave without disrupting the student learning environment.

The decision ends Guth’s administrative leave and is effective Friday, Oct. 25.

“The committee conducted a full review, and their input was instrumental in arriving at this decision,” Gray-Little said. “Our decisions throughout this situation have been guided by the facts and the law, respecting the interests of our students and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.”

Guth will begin a previously approved semester-long research sabbatical beginning in January 2014. Teaching assignments for the fall 2014 semester have not yet been made.



This past spring, KU welcomed world-renowned paleontologist, K. Christopher Beard, to the Jayhawk family. Beard joined one of the nation's top institutions in natural history, evolutionary biology, and biodiversity studies and a group of researchers among the top in their fields. “I have worked with a number of KU graduates over the years, so I am very familiar with the quality of the program. I have been greatly impressed with the positive, collaborative environment." To learn more about KU's Biodiversity Institue and Natural History Museum go here: http://biodiversity.ku.edu/ Tags: KU Natural History Museum #KUdifference #Biology #NaturalHistory #Science

KU students grow algae for biofuel, cleaner water KU's "Feedstock to Tailpipe Initiative" (see http://www.cebc.ku.edu/RET-2014) is working on a project that starts with algae. Researchers are demonstrating how community wastewater operations can add a large-scale, algae-growing facility that will not only return cleaner air and water back to nature, but also provide a sustainable source for biodiesel fuel.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times