Contact

Ashley Urban
Office for Diversity in Science Training
785-864-7316

Delegates attend biomedical research conference for minorities

Fri, 11/22/2013

LAWRENCE — Eight University of Kansas delegates attended the 2013 Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), which was Nov. 13-16 in Nashville. Delegates included eight students, three faculty from mathematics, molecular biosciences and pharmaceutical chemistry, and four staff from the Office for Diversity in Science Training, Graduate Studies and the Center for Undergraduate Research.

More than 3,300 students, faculty and administrators from across the country attended the conference, and 1,800 students participated in oral and poster research presentations. Only 250 received ABRCMS travel awards to attend the conference, and 180 presentation awards were given for undergraduate and graduate student presentations.

Four of the students received ABRCMS travel awards to attend the conference. Jenaqua Hairston, KU Post Baccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP), was recognized with a presentation award in biochemistry.

KU students attending the conference are listed below by hometown and are also identified by level in school and major. If the student received a travel scholarship, gave a presentation or won an award that is also noted.

  • Marvin Stops, of Billings, Mont., is a senior at Haskell Indian Nations University studying environmental science. Stops is part of the Bridge Program working with Cory Berkland, professor of chemical and petroleum engineering. Stops is affiliated with the Crow Tribe. He presented his research on “Cellular Response of Seeded Stem Cells on Methacrylate Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels.”
  • Christopher Trezza, of Smithtown, N.Y., is a senior at KU studying microbiology. Trezza is a scholar with the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) working with Matthew Buechner, associate professor of molecular biosciences. Trezza presented his research on “The Genetics of the Maintenance of Single-Celled Tube Diameter in C. elegans.”
  • Jenaqua Hairston has a bachelor of science in biology from Hampton University. Hairston is part of PREP working with Jackob Moskovitz, associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology. He presented his research on “Oxidation of C-terminal Protected Methionine by Hypochlorous Acid.” He attended the conference with support of an ABRCMS Travel Scholarship.
  • Simon Kelow has a bachelor of science in physics and astronomy from Northern Arizona University. Kelow is part of PREP working with John Karanicolas, assistant professor of molecular biosciences.  Kelow presented his research “Computational Methods to Identify New Inhibitors of protein-protein Interactions.” He attended the conference with support of an ABRCMS Travel Scholarship.
  • Sarena Senegal of Lake Charles, La., has a bachelor of science in chemistry (biochemistry) from Northwestern State University. Senegal is part of PREP working with Liang Xu, associate professor of molecular biosciences, and Paul Hanson, professor of chemistry. Senegal presented her research “Screening of Novel Compounds as Potential Inhibitors of Hu Antigen R-mRNA Binding Patterns.” She attended the conference with support of an ABRCMS Travel Scholarship.
  • Isaac Nzuki has a bachelor of arts in applied behavioral science from KU. Nzuki is part of PREP working with Pam Neidert, assistant professor of applied behavioral science. Nzuki presented his research “Vicarious Reinforcement: An Experimental Analysis of Potential Side Effects.” He attended the conference with support of an ABRCMS Travel Scholarship.
  • Alexander Fondaw, of Wichita, is a senior at KU studying biochemistry. Fondaw is an IMSD working with John Karanicolas, assistant professor of molecular biosciences.
  • Randi Cheatham has a bachelor of arts in psychology from Spelman College. Cheatham is part of PREP working with Paula Fite, assistant professor of applied behavioral science.


Matt Menzenski, a graduate student in Slavic languages & literatures, took this photo during President Obama’s speech at KU Thursday. Menzenski says he was struck by how relaxed the president was in his delivery. He missed a chance to hear former President Bill Clinton speak in his hometown in 2004, but finally got to see a sitting president this week at KU. “The opportunity to hear the president speak is just one of many great opportunities I've had at KU. So many interesting talks and events happen here all the time. I try to attend at least one a week-- it's never hard to find something interesting to go to.” Tags: University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences KU School of Languages, Literatures & Cultures KU Dept of Slavic Languages - Friends & Alumni Barack Obama The White House #exploreKU #POTUSatKU

#RockChalk to Dana Adkins-Heljeson of @KSgeology , recipient of the Outstanding Support Staff Recognition Award. http://t.co/PbwFlzZD8W
Explore KU: The Bells of Mount Oread KU’s Campanile, a 120-foot-tall timepiece that tolls automatically on the hour and quarter-hour, not only sounded in the 2015 New Year at midnight with 12 mighty gongs, but also regularly rings up memories for many Jayhawks – the 277 faculty and students who gave their lives during World War II, the graduates who walk through its doors at commencement, and aspiring students who have strolled through the Lawrence campus. (See http://bit.ly/1xjjwJj). For nearly 60 years, KU’s 53-bell carillon has been tolling the sounds of peace and serenity across Mount Oread since it was installed in June 1955 inside the landmark World War II Memorial Campanile, which was dedicated in 1951. (See http://bit.ly/1BoL9jv) The carillon is also a four-octave musical instrument, which is played with a giant keyboard and foot pedals. University Carillonneur Elizabeth Egber-Berghout (http://bit.ly/14fiBPl), associate professor of carillon and organ, climbs 77 steps up a spiral staircase in the bell tower to perform recitals several times a month.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times