Contact

Bill Steele
Graduate Military Programs
785-864-7478

KU awarded $775,000, designated as DOD Language Training Center

Fri, 01/24/2014

LAWRENCE — The Institute for International Education has awarded $775,000 from the Department of Defense to the University of Kansas to provide critical language instruction to the military, making KU one of nine DoD Language Training Centers in the United States.

The award will allow KU to provide onsite language training to U.S. Army personnel assigned to the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth and to U.S. Marines stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. The award follows the three-year Project Global Officer DoD grant KU received in 2012, which funds scholarships for future military officers to study strategic languages and cultures at KU and abroad.  

“This is very exciting news for the University of Kansas,” says Mike Denning, director of KU’s Office of Professional Military Graduate Education. “The significance of understanding languages and cultures for our military cannot be overstated. We are justifiably proud of the role we play providing that education to the Army and Marine Corps. This effort represents the hard work of our faculty and staff in building partnerships and educating the next generation of globally prepared military officers.”

KU instructors will travel the short distance to Fort Leavenworth to offer language maintenance courses in Arabic, French, German, Korean and Spanish to Army Special Forces officers. At Fort Leonard Wood, foundational language courses will be offered in French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish. KU instructors will teach these courses using a blended learning model with onsite native speakers and online course instruction.

The director of KU’s Center for East Asian Studies, Associate Professor Megan Greene, is leading the Language Training Center program along with co-principal investigators Randy Masten of KU’s Office of Graduate Military Programs and Jonathan Perkins of the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center. She noted that KU’s five federally funded area studies centers, its long tradition of educating experts in foreign languages and cultures, and its exceptionally strong departments of foreign languages made KU an attractive LTC site for the Defense Language and National Security Office (DLNSEO), which selected KU among nine other schools for funding in the 2013-2014 academic year.

“KU has a lot to offer in terms of the breadth and quality of our language programs, and we are very pleased to be able to extend our instruction in seven critical languages to members of the military,” Greene said.
 
Established in 2011, the Language Training Center program leverages the resources of the nation’s colleges and universities to provide customized training in strategic languages, cultures and area studies to meet the needs of the DoD. In recent years the DoD has identified a critical need to have more military personnel speak and understand critical languages including those being offered by KU’s LTC.



When looking to tackle the issue of obesity in rural America, where should we start? The answer is not what you might think. Empathy, says Christie Befort, an associate professor at KU who has just won a $10 million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to investigate solutions to rural obesity. Many physicians are embarrassed talking about weight—especially in a small town where everybody knows each other, Befort says. By providing obesity treatment options in rural primary care, she plans to start a conversation, and maybe a revolution, in rural health care. For more details on Befort's efforts, check out the 2015 Chancellor's Report: http://bit.ly/1D5A5MO and her video: http://bit.ly/1C5xYZa Tags: #KUcommunities #Obesity #Health #Rural #Midwest Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute - PCORI

Whistling the night away. #exploreKU shot by saamanthathomas on insta. http://t.co/JFZcj31X8h
Explore KU: Experience a KU Men's Basketball tradition It’s explosive. It’s dramatic. It’s intimidating. It’s a KU tradition (see more at http://bit.ly/KUtraditions) simply known as the Confetti Toss. But it creates a primal eruption of fan enthusiasm at the opening of every KU men’s basketball game at Allen Fieldhouse. It starts as the visiting team is introduced on court. The KU student section is visibly bored and unimpressed. The entire section under the north basket holds up University Daily Kansans — making the point they’d rather read the newspaper than even look at the other team. They shake and rustle the student newspapers. Then the moment they were waiting for arrives — the Jayhawks enter the court. All Rock Chalk breaks loose. Newspapers, confetti and thousands of thundering voices soar into already charged atmosphere of KU’s hallowed basketball arena. The confetti hits its high point, near the banner on the north wall reading “Pay Heed, All Who Enter: Beware of the Phog.” And the confetti rains back into the stands, onto the court and into the memories of all at hand. It’s time to play.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times