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Melanie Coen
Dole Institute of Politics
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Cindy Hensley McCain to talk leadership, volunteerism

Tue, 03/18/2014

LAWRENCE —The Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas announces an upcoming program with Cindy Hensley McCain. McCain will speak about her experiences as chair of Hensley & Company, her extensive work with a number of major charitable organizations and share some stories from the campaign trail. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 25, at the Dole Institute of Politics. This program is free and open to the public.

“Cindy Hensley McCain’s wide variety of experiences in business, philanthropy and volunteer work are evidence of her lifelong devotion to helping others,” said Dole Institute director Bill Lacy. “This program is sure to provide practical and inspirational information for all who dedicate themselves to leadership and volunteerism, regardless of political affiliations.”

Though she is best known publicly as the wife of 2008 presidential candidate U.S. Sen. John McCain, McCain is a successful businessperson and prolific philanthropist, exhibiting exemplary leadership in her own right. McCain founded the American Voluntary Medical Team in 1988 to provide emergency medical and surgical care to impoverished children throughout the world.

As a member of the board of trustees for the HALO Trust, a nonprofit organization dedicated to landmine removal and weapons destruction in war-torn countries, McCain is dedicated to the worldwide removal of landmines. She is also a founding member of the Eastern Congo Initiative. In her work with the initiative, she has traveled to the region five times in the last three years and is committed to raising awareness of the travesties facing women and children in the Congo.

McCain serves as co-chair of the Arizona Governor's task force on human trafficking. She is dedicated to efforts to reduce human trafficking in Arizona, throughout the United States and globally, as well as working to improve the lives of human trafficking victims. McCain recently joined the board of the Special Olympics Los Angeles 2015 summer games. She has also served on the Board of Directors for Operation Smile, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to repair cleft lips, cleft palates and other facial deformities for children around the world.

McCain is the chairman of her family’s business, Hensley & Company, which is one of the largest Anheuser-Busch distributors in the nation. She holds an undergraduate degree in education and a master’s degree in special education from the University of Southern California and is a member of the USC Rossier School of Education Board of Councilors. McCain resides in Phoenix with her husband, John McCain. They have four children.

This program is co-sponsored by KU Fights Hunger and KU’s Coalition Against Slavery & Trafficking.



David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he works with KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, are important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.” Tags: #KUcommunities #CivilRights #History American Studies at KU
Let's talk weight, seriously. Christie Befort changes obesity conversation. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/tPifpXsPvy
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


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