Natural History Museum welcomes new bee colony to exhibit

Fri, 05/09/2014

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Jen Humphrey
KU Natural History Museum
785-864-2344

LAWRENCE — The KU Natural History Museum will welcome a new bee colony to its bee tree and observation hive on the sixth floor of Dyche Hall on Friday, May 9.

Bees enter and exit the hive through a clear tube connected to an eastern-facing window.

The colony replaces bees that died as a result of unseasonably cold and snowy winter weather that closed KU for two days.

“Modifications have been made so that a shield can be inserted to block cold winds from entering directly into the hive during severe winter weather events," said Bruce Scherting, director of exhibits.

A gift from a KU alumna in honor of KU alumni Lawrence B. and Frances Moore of Lawrence funded the purchase of the new bee colony.

The Museum has improved the bee exhibit by placing a camera inside the hive that is connected to a live feed hosted by Grit Magazine. It is available online. Additional improvements are in the planning stages.

News about the struggles of pollinators — including bees, but also monarch butterflies and bats — has fueled interest in the bee tree exhibit. It remains one of the most popular exhibits of the museum.



This past spring, KU welcomed world-renowned paleontologist, K. Christopher Beard, to the Jayhawk family. Beard joined one of the nation's top institutions in natural history, evolutionary biology, and biodiversity studies and a group of researchers among the top in their fields. “I have worked with a number of KU graduates over the years, so I am very familiar with the quality of the program. I have been greatly impressed with the positive, collaborative environment." To learn more about KU's Biodiversity Institue and Natural History Museum go here: http://biodiversity.ku.edu/ Tags: KU Natural History Museum #KUdifference #Biology #NaturalHistory #Science

KU students grow algae for biofuel, cleaner water KU's "Feedstock to Tailpipe Initiative" (see http://www.cebc.ku.edu/RET-2014) is working on a project that starts with algae. Researchers are demonstrating how community wastewater operations can add a large-scale, algae-growing facility that will not only return cleaner air and water back to nature, but also provide a sustainable source for biodiesel fuel.


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