Featured news at KU


Our top featured stories

An image of a hand operating a laptop with graphics of social media interaction, likes and social networks.
Social media has allowed citizens and community organizations to reach people much more easily while news organizations have shrunk. But a new study found news outlets still lead the way in sharing difficult information on topics like the COVID-19 pandemic.

Other featured news

Chart showing younger species are generally at greater risk of extinction.

Scientists may have cracked the ‘aging process’ in species

New research from the University of Kansas might resolve a mystery in the “aging process” in species — or, how a species’ risk of going extinct changes after that species appears on the scene.
Image of a classic yellow school bus

New book helps school leaders focus on what they can do without getting weighed down

No one can do everything. Yet that is exactly what many school leaders feel like they must do. A new book co-written by a KU scholar aims to help those who often feel overwhelmed focus on what they can and should do and how to help teachers and students lead schools to reaching their full potential.
Cropped image from 'Power to Yield' book cover

Author creates fantastic fiction grounded in reality

At some level, you have to write what you know, and KU faculty member Bogi Takács Perelmutter does that in their new collection of fantastical tales, titled "Power to Yield and Other Stories."
Glowing silhouette of exoplanet set to stars with bright sun nearby.

Neptune-like exoplanets can be cloudy or clear — new findings suggest the reason why

A KU researcher has published findings in The Astrophysical Journal Letters showing new atmospheric detail in a set of 15 exoplanets similar to Neptune. While none could support humanity, a better understanding of their behavior might help us to understand why we don’t have a small Neptune, while most solar systems seem to feature a planet of this class.

Research



Margaret Kelley, professor of American studies, examines the complex and often counterintuitive relationship between racism and gun ownership in a new paper. The results suggest that racism, including fear of other races, is not associated with gun ownership. However, cognitive and apathetic indicators of racism influence gun control attitudes for at least some white individuals.
No one can do everything. Yet that is exactly what many school leaders feel like they must do. A new book co-written by a KU scholar aims to help those who often feel overwhelmed focus on what they can and should do and how to help teachers and students lead schools to reaching their full potential.
Portrait of Antonio de Erauso by Juan van der Hamen y León in 1626, left, and portrait of Chevalier d’Eon by Thomas Stewart in 1792. Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Professor Marta Vicente studied the portraits of two renowned gender-ambiguous individuals: the 17th century Spanish soldier Antonio/Catalina de Erauso and 18th century French diplomat the Chevalier d’Eon. Their paintings appear as part of the artistic and scientific explorations that negotiated changing concepts of nature during early modern Europe.

Kansas Communities



The Dole Institute of Politics, in partnership with the Kansas Rural Center (KRC), has announced the four-part series of discussion groups to be moderated by Dole Institute Fellow Karen Willey this spring. Obstacles & Opportunities: Tackling Sustainability in Kansas continues Feb. 27 with “Sink or Swim: The Future of Water in Kansas."
The University of Kansas Center for Public Partnerships & Research is conducting a yearlong, comprehensive statewide needs assessment of substance use disorder systems and related work in Kansas that will be used to guide the future, long-term investment strategies of the Kansas Fights Addiction Grant Review Board.
Map of 36 small Kansas cities studied, from book by Mahbub Rashid
A new book from KU's dean of the School of Architecture & Design examines 36 small cities in Kansas for the correlation between their spatial planning and design and residents' lifestyle behaviors and health indicators.

Economic Development



A $3 million initiative based at the University of Kansas will empower biomedical researchers in public universities and colleges across several Plains states to carry their innovations to the marketplace.
A new degree program at the University of Kansas will send students into the cybersecurity market armed with tools to create programs and systems that protect the world’s most critical assets from hacking, ransomware and other immensely disruptive crimes and mischief generated during the digital age. Students completing the required 126 credit hours will be equipped to protect data, computer systems and networks from unauthorized access and destruction involving government entities.
Signage for the Wonderful Institute for Sustainable Engineering-KU, white text on royal blue background, next to glass display case with portraits.
KU's Institute for Sustainable Engineering has a new name —Wonderful Institute for Sustainable Engineering-KU (WISE-KU). The naming builds on the university’s deep relationship with The Wonderful Company, a global agricultural company co-founded and led by Stewart and Lynda Resnick.

Student experience and achievement



More than 8,000 undergraduate students at the University of Kansas earned honor roll distinction for the fall 2023 semester.  Honor roll criteria vary among the university’s academic units.
Nine University of Kansas students and alumni have advanced to the semifinalist round for Fulbright U.S. Student Program awards, which will provide funding to study, conduct research or teach English abroad for the 2024-2025 academic year.
Elizabeth Appel, KU senior
Elizabeth Appel, a senior in civil engineering with an emphasis in environmental engineering, is the most recent Jayhawk to be named a Gates Cambridge scholar, bringing the university’s total number of winners to four since the program was established.

Campus news



In 1924, the National League of Cities was founded at KU in the original Fraser Hall. To commemorate this historic milestone, NLC, the KU School of Public Affairs & Administration, the League of Kansas Municipalities and the city of Lawrence will convene at KU for a daylong celebration.
The School of Pharmacy has lowered its nonresident tuition $50,000 over the course of its four-year Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program. The tuition reduction applies to first-year pharmacy students admitted during the current academic year and beyond.
Jayhawk statue against streaky pink sky.
The University of Kansas and KU Endowment have announced a new date for One Day. One KU. The 24-hour giving day will now take place March 6.

Latest news

Bronze Jayhawk statue

KU welcomes Ukrainian food anthropologist, historian as visiting professor

An anthropologist and historian from Lviv, Ukraine, with expertise in the cultural exchange and culinary traditions of Eastern Europe has joined KU for the 2024-25 calendar year, with a public talk planned April 11 on "Gastronomic Traditions and Collective Memory in Eastern Europe."
An image of a hand operating a laptop with graphics of social media interaction, likes and social networks.

Study shows news organizations still lead in sharing difficult information on social media

Social media has allowed citizens and community organizations to reach people much more easily while news organizations have shrunk. But a new study found news outlets still lead the way in sharing difficult information on topics like the COVID-19 pandemic.
Portrait of Kristin Bowman-James along with blue-tint image of sunflower field.

Kansas chemist Kristin Bowman-James wins award honoring decades of commitment to science statewide

University of Kansas Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Kristin Bowman-James will receive the will receive the Joseph G. Danek Award, which recognizes her commitment to enhancing the research infrastructure in Kansas by forging collaborations across institutions and disciplines.
KU skyline with pink sky and clouds.

University Distinguished Professor Sarah Deer will highlight advocacy in lecture that examines tribal statutes on sexual violence

Sarah Deer will present “What if Survivors Wrote the Laws? An Exploration of Tribal Statutes on Sexual Violence” at 5:30 p.m. March 4 in the Malott Room at the Kansas Union.