Research


Featured research news

A stamp with the word “audit” sits atop files labeled “financial statement” and “accounting records.”
Mike Wilkins, the Larry D. Horner and KPMG Professor of Accounting at KU, examines the effects of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board's decision to move to more random-based audit selection. The findings suggest there are more benefits than costs associated with auditors’ responses to a selection approach that is primarily risk-based.

Science and Technology



Amy Hansen has won a five-year, $577,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for her work to understand the role of vegetation in nitrogen exchange and removal in riparian wetlands.
A KU legal scholar contributed to a study that found AI emitted hundreds of times less carbon than humans in the tasks of writing and illustrating. That does not mean they should replace humans, but their environmental impact and how the two can work together should be considered, researchers said.
Illustration of notable exoplanets included in TESS-Keck survey
New findings from an astronomer at the University of Kansas offer new understanding of the makeup of exoplanets and their star systems generally.

Health and Well-Being



The KU Life Span Institute will welcome hundreds of scientists, students and practitioners for a conference focused on research in the field of intellectual and developmental disability from April 17 to 19 in Kansas City, Missouri.
Messages in which a hesitant person detailed their decision about getting vaccinated also reduced resistance to inoculation, KU research shows. The findings could guide future public health communications.
Facebook screen image
The desire to express political anger seems so strong that it overrides the instinct, found in older research, to control one’s anger in public, according to a new paper co-written by a University of Kansas professor of communication studies.

Teaching, Learning and Behavior



A pair of studies examines why athletes feel authenticity is vital to their personal branding and how an athlete's personal life influences their brand, including aspects of their romantic life. The findings both better illustrate how athletes use branding to advance in their sport and the racial and gendered implications of personal life on athletes' perception by the public.
The Achievement & Assessment Institute has announced the opening of Well-Fit | Center for Youth Wellness and Fitness. The center is based on the principle that youths should be provided knowledge and skills through STEM learning and in-person programming to improve physical wellness and fitness.
Liz Langdon, standing among library shelves
Liz Langdon joined the faculty of KU's Department of Visual Art when she was 65 after an extensive career in art education. She writes of the "long hill" she has climbed and vistas yet to conquer for a chapter in a new book titled "Art Education and Creative Aging: Older Adults as Learners, Makers, and Teachers of Art."

Arts, Architecture and Humanities



For his next project, Academy Award winner Kevin Willmott, KU professor of film & media studies, turns his camera on a Kansas City civil rights icon, Alvin Brooks, in a documentary about one of the city's first Black police officers and its first Black department head.
Liz Langdon joined the faculty of KU's Department of Visual Art when she was 65 after an extensive career in art education. She writes of the "long hill" she has climbed and vistas yet to conquer for a chapter in a new book titled "Art Education and Creative Aging: Older Adults as Learners, Makers, and Teachers of Art."
Spencer Research Library
Alyssa Cole, assistant professor of African American studies at the University of Florida, and Brooke Thomas, African American history postdoctoral scholar at Pennsylvania State University, are the recipients of the 2024 Alyce Hunley Whayne Visiting Researchers Travel Award from KU Libraries. They will visit KU from June 24 to 27 with a joint public presentation at 3 p.m. June 26 in the Johnson Room.

Business, Economics and Innovation



Jack Zhang, assistant professor of political science, introduces both a new dataset on sanctions involving China and a research framework for expanding knowledge about non-Western economic sanctions more generally.
In a new paper, Nathan Meikle, a KU assistant professor of business, examines the human biases that impede assessment of AI’s potential threats to humanity. His experiments find that people are prone to underestimate AI capabilities due to exponential growth bias and that they reject the aversive implications of rapid technological progress even in cases in which they themselves predict the growth rate.
A stamp with the word “audit” sits atop files labeled “financial statement” and “accounting records.”
Mike Wilkins, the Larry D. Horner and KPMG Professor of Accounting at KU, examines the effects of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board's decision to move to more random-based audit selection. The findings suggest there are more benefits than costs associated with auditors’ responses to a selection approach that is primarily risk-based.

Law, Politics and Society



Public speaking was among the vehicles the writer and reformer used to tell his story of enslavement, to call for abolition and to defend Black Americans’ rights. A KU scholar unravels how relationships with his audiences are context for his ideological transformation.
A KU researcher will be part of a partnership to establish the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 2027, the latest effort from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics to understand how youths take part in the labor market and how that affects their lives and livelihood.
An aerial view of a cul de sac and streets of houses.
New KU findings counter a common narrative that the United States is facing a housing shortage. The study analyzed Census survey data to determine how many cities had shortages of housing stock and compared it to median income for an area.